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Is self the same in both of these cases?

class Person
   def who_am_i?
     puts self       # self?
   end
end

ted = Person.new
def ted.singleton_who_am_i?
   puts self         # self?
end

ted.who_am_i?
ted.singleton_who_am_i?
share|improve this question
    
Well, you tried it, and what did you get? -1 because it's one copy'n'paste away and could easily have been a useful question. What does self mean when the method is invoked? (self is a keyword and not a bound variable.) –  user166390 Apr 24 '12 at 16:49
    
Just trying to understand better the scope / environment during each execution. I know it is a bit different in each. Don't get upset :) –  slindsey3000 Apr 24 '12 at 16:54
    
So ... run it. What happens? Was it expected? If not, why not? Then formulate that into a question. You may be interested in just returning self (e.g. no "puts") because then you could also do ted.who_am_i? == test.singleton_who_am_i?, for instance. –  user166390 Apr 24 '12 at 16:55
    
Also, if you run the expressions on the REPL (and let the REPL print the results instead of using "puts") it will use inspect by default (and not to_s) which is often handier in playing around. –  user166390 Apr 24 '12 at 16:58

3 Answers 3

Yes, it appears so:

class Person
  def who_am_i?
    puts self.to_yaml
  end
end

ted = Person.new
def ted.singleton_who_am_i?
  puts self.to_yaml
end

ted.who_am_i?
--- !ruby/object:Person {}

ted.singleton_who_am_i?
--- !ruby/object:Person {}
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1  
That is correct. Can you expand on the behavior of self and what it means (esp. in context of inside a method) though? –  user166390 Apr 24 '12 at 17:57
class Foo
  def bar
    p self
  end
end

class << Foo
  def bar
    p self
  end
end

Foo.bar              #Foo (the class itself)
Foo.new.bar          #<Foo:0x10acc70> (a Foo class object)

When the context is in a object, self is the object.

When the context is in the class, self is the class.

Also I do know if "singleton" is a good word for Ruby because in Ruby, even a class is an object, and "singleton" simply adds method to an existing object.

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This is true, but subtly different than the original question. And "singleton" is an awful term because it is so overloaded ;-) –  user166390 Apr 24 '12 at 22:57

Singleton methods are instance methods only a certain object responds to. Here's how this is implemented:

  1. The object's singleton class is opened;
  2. Ruby defines your singleton method as an instance method of the singleton class.

What is not apparent here is the actual relationship between the actual class and singleton class. One could say it sits between the class and the object.

More precisely, the singleton class inherits from the actual class, and actually is the object's class.

Why doesn't Object#class return the singleton class, you ask? Well, it simply skips over it. Yeah.

Here's an example. Given the following class:

class Person
  def instance; self end  # self is the Person instance here
end

person = Person.new

If we wanted to define a singleton method for person, we could write this:

class << person
  def singleton; self end  # What is self in this context?
end

This is roughly equivalent to this:

class SingletonPerson < Person
  def singleton; self end  # self is the Person instance here too!
end

person = SingletonPerson.new

The main difference is that Ruby knows that SingletonPerson is a singleton class, so when you call person.class you actually get Person and not SingletonPerson.

This effectively hides all this complexity from you, which is a great thing. However, it is also great to understand how things work under the hood. The same logic here applies to class methods, which are really just singleton methods of a Class or Module instance.

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Yes, but self inside a class (or class singleton) is not the same as the self inside a method. Inside a method self always evaluates to the receiver (the object the message was sent to). (This is the object that the message was sent to, independent of how many parent classes or singletons there are in the MRO.) –  user166390 Apr 24 '12 at 22:55

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