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I need to get the GPS coordinates of an image taken with the iOS device's camera. I do not care about the Camera Roll images, just the image taken with UIImagePickerControllerSourceTypeCamera.

I've read many stackoverflow answers, like Get Exif data from UIImage - UIImagePickerController, which either assumes you are using the AssetsLibrary framework, which doesn't seem to work on camera images, or use CoreLocaiton to get the latitude/longitude from the app itself, not from the image.

Using CoreLocation is not an option. That will not give me the coordinates when the shutter button was pressed. (With the CoreLocation based solutions, you either need to record the coords before you bring up the camera view or after, and of course if the device is moving the coordinates will be wrong. This method should work with a stationary device.)

I am iOS5 only, so I don't need to support older devices. This is also for a commercial product so I cannot use http://code.google.com/p/iphone-exif/.

So, what are my options for reading the GPS data from the image returned by the camera in iOS5? All I can think of right now is to save the image to Camera Roll and then use the AssetsLibrary, but that seems hokey.

Thanks!


Here's the code I wrote based on Caleb's answer.

    UIImage *image =  [info objectForKey:UIImagePickerControllerOriginalImage];

    NSData *jpeg = UIImageJPEGRepresentation(image,1.0);
    CGImageSourceRef  source ;
    source = CGImageSourceCreateWithData((__bridge CFDataRef)jpeg, NULL);

    NSDictionary *metadataNew = (__bridge NSDictionary *) CGImageSourceCopyPropertiesAtIndex(source,0,NULL);  

    NSLog(@"%@",metadataNew);

and my Console shows:

    2012-04-26 14:15:37:137 ferret[2060:1799] {
        ColorModel = RGB;
        Depth = 8;
        Orientation = 6;
        PixelHeight = 1936;
        PixelWidth = 2592;
        "{Exif}" =     {
            ColorSpace = 1;
            PixelXDimension = 2592;
            PixelYDimension = 1936;
        };
        "{JFIF}" =     {
            DensityUnit = 0;
            JFIFVersion =         (
                1,
                1
            );
            XDensity = 1;
            YDensity = 1;
        };
        "{TIFF}" =     {
            Orientation = 6;
        };
    }

No latitude/longitude.

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Hi Paul did you got correct answer? actually i also finding this kind of solution, if u got then can you give that sample code to me. –  Sandy Patel Mar 19 at 9:38
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7 Answers

We have worked a lot with the camera and UIImagePickerController and, at least up to and including iOS 5.1.1, it does not return location data in the metadata for either photos or videos shot with UIImagePickerController.

It doesn't matter whether location services is enabled for the Camera app or not; this controls the Camera app's use of location services, not the camera function within UIImagePickerController.

You app will need to use the CLLocation class to get the location and then add it to the image or video returned from the camera. Whether your app can get the location will depend on whether the user authorizes access to location services for your app. And note that the user can disable location services for you app (or entirely for the device) at any time via Settings > Location Services.

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This is the answer. –  fog Jan 31 '13 at 15:37
    
This is partly true. Apple does strip out GPS data from EXIF. But you can open the RAW data of the image, and parse the data yourself. –  Guilherme Torres Castro Jan 16 at 18:22
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The problem is that since iOS 4 UIImage *image = [info objectForKey:UIImagePickerControllerOriginalImage]; strips the geolocation out. To solve this problem you have to use the original photo path to get access to the full image metadata. With something like this:

- (void)imagePickerController:(UIImagePickerController *)picker didFinishPickingMediaWithInfo:(NSDictionary *)info {
    NSURL *referenceURL = [info objectForKey:UIImagePickerControllerReferenceURL];
    ALAssetsLibrary *library = [[ALAssetsLibrary alloc] init];
    [library assetForURL:referenceURL resultBlock:^(ALAsset *asset) {
        ALAssetRepresentation *rep = [asset defaultRepresentation];
        NSDictionary *metadata = rep.metadata;
        NSLog(@"%@", metadata);

        CGImageRef iref = [rep fullScreenImage] ;

        if (iref) {
            self.imageView.image = [UIImage imageWithCGImage:iref];
        }
    } failureBlock:^(NSError *error) {
        // error handling
    }];

The output should be something like:

{
    ColorModel = RGB;
    DPIHeight = 72;
    DPIWidth = 72;
    Depth = 8;
    Orientation = 6;
    PixelHeight = 1936;
    PixelWidth = 2592;
    "{Exif}" =     {
        ApertureValue = "2.970854";
        BrightnessValue = "1.115874";
        ColorSpace = 1;
        ComponentsConfiguration =         (
            0,
            0,
            0,
            1
        );
        DateTimeDigitized = "2012:07:14 21:55:05";
        DateTimeOriginal = "2012:07:14 21:55:05";
        ExifVersion =         (
            2,
            2,
            1
        );
        ExposureMode = 0;
        ExposureProgram = 2;
        ExposureTime = "0.06666667";
        FNumber = "2.8";
        Flash = 24;
        FlashPixVersion =         (
            1,
            0
        );
        FocalLength = "3.85";
        ISOSpeedRatings =         (
            200
        );
        MeteringMode = 5;
        PixelXDimension = 2592;
        PixelYDimension = 1936;
        SceneCaptureType = 0;
        SensingMethod = 2;
        Sharpness = 2;
        ShutterSpeedValue = "3.9112";
        SubjectArea =         (
            1295,
            967,
            699,
            696
        );
        WhiteBalance = 0;
    };
    "{GPS}" =     {
        Altitude = "1167.528";
        AltitudeRef = 0;
        ImgDirection = "278.8303";
        ImgDirectionRef = T;
        Latitude = "15.8235";
        LatitudeRef = S;
        Longitude = "47.99416666666666";
        LongitudeRef = W;
        TimeStamp = "00:55:04.59";
    };
    "{TIFF}" =     {
        DateTime = "2012:07:14 21:55:05";
        Make = Apple;
        Model = "iPhone 4";
        Orientation = 6;
        ResolutionUnit = 2;
        Software = "5.1.1";
        XResolution = 72;
        YResolution = 72;
        "_YCbCrPositioning" = 1;
    };
}
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I need to check this out Carlos, looks promising! –  Paul Cezanne Sep 3 '12 at 0:38
    
Sadly, it didn't work. I'm guessing you are pulling from the Photo Library, not directly from the camera. [info objectForKey:UIImagePickerControllerReferenceURL]; return nil for Camera images. I DO have a UIImagePickerControllerReferenceURL if I read from the Photo Library. –  Paul Cezanne Oct 11 '12 at 16:08
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You're not using the image data from the camera in the code you've posted, you've generated a JPEG representation of it, which would essentially discard all the metadata. Use image.CGImage like Caleb suggested.

Also:

This is also for a commercial product so I cannot use http://code.google.com/p/iphone-exif/.

The author quite clearly states that commercial licensing is available.

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1) But image.CGImage is a CGImageRef, not a CFDataRef. I both get a compiler warning, which if ignored results in a "unrecognized selector" crash. 2) I'm an unfunded startup right now, once funded I'll gladly look at commercial libraries! –  Paul Cezanne Apr 26 '12 at 18:39
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Can't say I've needed to do exactly this in my own stuff, but from the docs it seems pretty clear that if you're using UIImagePickerController you can get the image that the user just took from the -imagePicker:didFinishPickingMediaWithInfo: delegate method. Use the key UIImagePickerControllerOriginalImage to get the image.

Once you've got the image, you should be able to access its properties, including EXIF data, as described in QA1654 Accessing image properties with ImageIO. To create the CGImageSource, I'd look at CGImageSourceCreateWithData() and use the data that you get from the UIImage's CGImage method. Once you've got the image source, you can access the various attributes via CGImageSourceCopyProperties().

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Sadly, that doesn't give the latitude/longitude. I'll edit my question so you can see my source and results... –  Paul Cezanne Apr 26 '12 at 18:13
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up vote 2 down vote accepted

One possibility is to leaving CoreLocation running when the camera is visible. Record each CCLocation into an array along with the time of the sample. When the photo comes back, find its time, then match the closest CClocation from the array.

Sounds kludgy but it will work.

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1  
+1 for use of "kludgy" –  Lyndon Jun 3 '13 at 18:58
    
kludgy, yes, but in the months since I've posted this I've not really had a chance to work on it more but I'm really starting to think that this is the only way to get it absolutely correct. –  Paul Cezanne Jun 4 '13 at 1:11
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In your UIImagePickerController delegate, do the following:

- (void)imagePickerController:(UIImagePickerController *)picker didFinishPickingMediaWithInfo:(NSDictionary *)info
{
  NSDictionary *metadata = [info valueForKey:UIImagePickerControllerMediaMetadata];

  // metadata now contains all the image metadata.  Extract GPS data from here.
}
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I'll check it out, but I'm not hopeful. I think I looked at that already, not sure... –  Paul Cezanne May 2 '12 at 22:59
    
That will only work if the image HAS metadata. It may not if the image doesn't have GPS data or the iPhone camera was set to not save GPS coordinates when the picture was taken. –  rekle May 3 '12 at 3:15
    
No GPS info in there, sorry. Didn't think so. –  Paul Cezanne May 3 '12 at 10:39
    
I checked Settings/Location Services. Camera was set to ON so I don't think that that was the issue, but is there somehwhere else to check? If so, please leave an answer, can't award the bounty to a comment... –  Paul Cezanne May 3 '12 at 10:40
    
I just sync'd my phone with my laptop, my images do have GPS location data in them, so I know that Camera does it. –  Paul Cezanne May 3 '12 at 15:01
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As point out by Chris Markle, Apple does strip out GPS data from EXIF. But you can open the RAW data of the image, and parse the data yourself or use a third party lib to do that, for example: https://code.google.com/p/iphone-exif/.

Here is a sample code:

- (void) imagePickerController: (UIImagePickerController *) picker
 didFinishPickingMediaWithInfo: (NSDictionary *) info {

    ALAssetsLibrary *library = [[ALAssetsLibrary alloc] init];
    [library assetForURL:[info objectForKey:UIImagePickerControllerReferenceURL]
             resultBlock:^(ALAsset *asset) {

                 ALAssetRepresentation *image_representation = [asset defaultRepresentation];
                 NSUInteger size = (NSUInteger)image_representation.size;
                 // create a buffer to hold image data
                 uint8_t *buffer = (Byte*)malloc(size);
                 NSUInteger length = [image_representation getBytes:buffer fromOffset: 0.0  length:size error:nil];

                 if (length != 0)  {

                     // buffer -> NSData object; free buffer afterwards
                     NSData *adata = [[NSData alloc] initWithBytesNoCopy:buffer length:size freeWhenDone:YES];

                     EXFJpeg* jpegScanner = [[EXFJpeg alloc] init];
                     [jpegScanner scanImageData: adata];
                     EXFMetaData* exifData = jpegScanner.exifMetaData;

                     id latitudeValue = [exifData tagValue:[NSNumber numberWithInt:EXIF_GPSLatitude]];
                     id longitudeValue = [exifData tagValue:[NSNumber numberWithInt:EXIF_GPSLongitude]];
                     id datetime = [exifData tagValue:[NSNumber numberWithInt:EXIF_DateTime]];
                     id t = [exifData tagValue:[NSNumber numberWithInt:EXIF_Model]];

                     self.locationLabel.text = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"Local: %@ - %@",latitudeValue,longitudeValue];
                     self.dateLavel.text = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"Data: %@", datetime];

                 }
                 else {
                     NSLog(@"image_representation buffer length == 0");
                 }
             }
            failureBlock:^(NSError *error) {
                NSLog(@"couldn't get asset: %@", error);
            }
     ];
}
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I think you are reading from the Camera Roll, I need to read the data from the camera. –  Paul Cezanne Jan 16 at 21:22
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