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I've made a version of the old risk board game. I'm using java.util.Random to implement the die rolls when armies attack one another. For example, when 3 armies attack a territory with two armies, I have to "roll" 5 die in total:

Attacker rolls: 3 die
Defender rolls: 2 die

int[] rollsAttacker = new int[3];
int[] rollsDefender = new int[2];

for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
    rollsAttacker[i] = mRandom.nextInt(6) + 1;
}
for (int i = 0; i < 2; i++) {
    rollsDefender[i] = mRandom.nextInt(6) + 1;
}

// compare rolls and figure out who won...
// ...

I'm getting an unusually high number of complaints that there are too many "upsets". For example, an army of 100 might lose to an army of 2. I've run my roll methods several millions of times to test win/lose ratios, and they match up nearly exactly with what other sites that do the same thing show.

I was thinking of switching to SecureRandom which might be "more random", but don't know if it's worth it. I don't know what state util.Random might be getting in to produce such upsets so frequently. Users can play on mobile devices, so is it possible that the implementation of util.Random produces less variance on some platforms? (complaints do seem to be coming from a particular brand of phone).

So in short, I'm not sure if switching to SecureRandom will help in my case, if it's considerably slower, or if I'm just not using util.Random properly,

Thanks

----------- Update ----------------

Example of a 4 vs 1 attack where the defender wins overall.

Attacking 4 vs 1...
  Roll:
    a: 5, 5, 4
    d: 6
  Roll:
    a: 5, 2
    d: 5
  Roll:
    a: 3
    d: 5

Defender survived!

I've tried running my attack method in batches of 20,000 runs for the above 4 vs 1 attack, and the attacker wins 91% of the time. This is much lower than the 97% win rate put out on the wikipedia page for this game:

odds from wikipedia

Argh.

------ Update (again) -------------

Actually, I was looking at the chart one slot behind accidentally, my numbers line up with what the chart has:

0.4139    0.7502    0.9132    0.97245   0.99015   0.9964    0.9991    0.99975   0.9999    1.0       
0.10865   0.36105   0.649     0.78555   0.8924    0.9343    0.9691    0.98      0.9904    0.9951    
0.02655   0.2065    0.4729    0.6414    0.76725   0.8584    0.9121    0.94605   0.9687    0.982     
0.00665   0.0905    0.3182    0.48215   0.63985   0.7432    0.8304    0.8894    0.9274    0.9525    
0.0015    0.04775   0.20575   0.35955   0.50885   0.64125   0.7389    0.8168    0.8753    0.9164    
5.5E-4    0.0229    0.1323    0.25105   0.39385   0.52695   0.6436    0.7254    0.805     0.86415   
0.0       0.00975   0.0854    0.18075   0.29985   0.42645   0.5389    0.64695   0.72615   0.8009    
5.0E-5    0.00545   0.05515   0.1255    0.2228    0.3307    0.4438    0.54365   0.64505   0.723     
0.0       0.00255   0.03225   0.0877    0.16005   0.2576    0.3519    0.46685   0.559     0.6445    
0.0       0.00125   0.0201    0.0569    0.11595   0.19315   0.2898    0.374     0.47505   0.56275      

So yeah not sure what I can tell users except that upsets can happen.

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
And then how is the winner decided based on all of those rolls? Maybe it's a logic flaw. –  James Montagne Apr 24 '12 at 16:55
4  
It seems more likely that your logic is problematic than that Random isn't "random enough." –  Louis Wasserman Apr 24 '12 at 16:59

1 Answer 1

How can an army of 100 (minimum total roll 100) lose to an army of 2 (maximum total roll 12)? Indeed, are you sure your logic is correct farther down?

FWIW the snippet you posted looks fine, and I can't imagine that Random's tiny shortcomings in distributions would make a measurable difference.

share|improve this answer
    
Maybe I'm misinterpreting the rules - let's simplify to a 100 vs 1 scenario. I thought the max die the attacker could roll is 3, and the defender, 2. In a 100 vs 1 fight, the defender could completely defeat the attacker, if they were to roll a 6 on every attack? –  user291701 Apr 24 '12 at 18:03
    
Why I hate "Risk" the game: the rules say, even in a 100 vs 1 scenario, that the attacking army can roll a maximum of 3 dice, not 100 dice. It's 1 die per army up to a maximum of 3. –  Stephen P Apr 24 '12 at 18:19
    
@Stephen, In Risk, if the attacker has 3 armies, the maximum number of dice he can roll is 2. –  GriffeyDog Apr 24 '12 at 18:49
    
Ah, I see. I actually looked up the rules: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Risk_(game)#Attacking Yes the attacker can roll up to 3, the defender up to 2. The page there works out the probabilities quite nicely, and it's not uncommon for the attacker to lose a skirmish of course given this. So maybe it's not your code that's wrong but mistaken users (like me) who perceive that a 100-vs-2 battle should almost always win for the attacker? –  Sean Owen Apr 24 '12 at 19:23
    
@Sean, right yeah that's what I'm thinking, they don't understand that max 3 die are rolled for the attacker per attack even if they have 100 units total. So it's definitely possible that the attacker could lose, however the chances should be small. Upsets like these aren't reported often, but I was still curious if there was something with util.Random that could make it get "stuck" spitting out the same number repeatedly maybe, that could definitely cause the defender to win a 100 vs 1 attack for example. –  user291701 Apr 24 '12 at 19:37

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