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I am trying to write a binary function that takes two vectors(of the same length) and adds them by value. For some reason the following code does not work:

struct Plusval : binary_function <std::vector<int>,std::vector<int>,std::vector<int> > 
{
  std::vector<int> operator() (const std::vector<int>& x, const std::vector<int>& y) const
{
    std::vector<int> ret(x);
    std::vector<int>::iterator itx,ity;
    ity=y.begin();
    for (itx=ret.begin();itx<ret.end();++itx)
    {
        ret[*itx]+=y[*ity];
        ++ity;
    }
    return ret;
  }
};

I get an error that I can't do ity=y.begin() However, the following code does work

struct Plusval : binary_function <std::vector<int>,std::vector<int>,std::vector<int> > 
{
  std::vector<int> operator() (const std::vector<int>& x, const std::vector<int>& y) const
{
    std::vector<int> ret(x);
    std::vector<int> yloc(y);
    std::vector<int>::iterator itx,ity;
    ity=yloc.begin();
    for (itx=ret.begin();itx<ret.end();++itx)
    {
        ret[*itx]+=yloc[*ity];
        ++ity;
    }
    return ret;
  }
};

Obviously, the second version will take longer (since it has to copy an additional vector). Is it because the input is a const vector? If it is, is there any reason it needs to be? Note that I am planning on using this function as an input to the allreduce() function in boost::mpi if that makes any difference

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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You define ity as vector::iterator y is const and returns a const_iterator.

What is more important is: Don't use binary_function. The adapters have been deprecated.

Also, your function does not do what you want. *itx returns the value stored at the position pointed to by itx and you use it to index into the you intend to return vector.

I would write this with a binary transform.

std::vector<int> res;
std::transform(begin(x), end(x), begin(y), 
               std::back_inserter(res), std::plus<int>());
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1  
This is a more elegant solution than mine below. –  alanxz Apr 24 '12 at 17:14
    
I should add the reserve anyway. And mine only sums up to the end of x. It assumes the caller has done his homework. –  pmr Apr 24 '12 at 17:15
    
Thanks for all your help. –  Kyle Apr 24 '12 at 22:45
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The error is that you cannot use non-const iterators with a const container, as that would break const-correctness. You should use std::vector<int>::const_iterator on the second argument.

Other than that, the implementation in the first block does not do what you claim it does.You are iterating over the container and using the stored values to index into the container and update there. If you actually want to add the values from the two containers, it is much simpler than that:

struct PlusVal
{
   std::vector<int> operator()( std::vector<int> lhs, std::vector<int> const& rhs )
   {
      assert( lhs.size() == rhs.size() );
      for (std::vector<int>::size_type i = 0; i < lhs.size; ++i )
         lhs[i] += rhs[i];
      return lhs;
   }
};

If you want to do that with iterators, it is again similarly simple:

struct PlusVal
{
   std::vector<int> operator()( std::vector<int> lhs, std::vector<int> const& rhs )
   {
      assert( lhs.size() == rhs.size() );
      std::vector<int>::iterator it = lhs.begin(), end = lhs.end();
      std::vector<int>::const_iterator rit = rhs.begin();
      while ( it != end )
         *it++ += *rit++;
      return lhs;
   }
};
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Thanks a lot. The subtleties of using various languages often gets me. –  Kyle Apr 24 '12 at 17:17
    
@Kyle: You actually should use transform as pmr points in his answer (you should also accept his answer). It is much cleaner than rolling your own loop. It is clearer in showing the intent of the operation other than having to read through the loop. (To pmr's answer I would add the assert and possibly a reserve to reduce the number of reallocations, maybe changing the first argument to be by value might have a small improvement in performance in a few cases where the first argument is a temporary...) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Apr 24 '12 at 17:20
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You're looking for the std::vector::const_iterator type

std::vector<int> operator() (const std::vector<int>& x, const std::vector<int>& y)
{
  std::vector<int> result;

  // Not strictly necessary, but helps with performance a bit
  result.reserve(std::min(x.length(), y.length());

  for (std::vector<int>::const_iterator x_it = x.begin(),
                                      y_it = y.begin();
      x_it != x.end() && y_it != y.end();
      ++x_it, ++y_it)
  {
   result.push_back(*x_it + *y_it);
  }

  return result;
}
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Actually @pmr 's solution is a bit more elegant, though I'll leave this year for example's sake. –  alanxz Apr 24 '12 at 17:13
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It looks like you've already gotten a reasonable answer or two; I'll just point out an alternative. Though I hesitate to mention it, std::valarray fits so well for this I just can't resist:

std::valarray<int> x;
std::valarray<int> y;

// code to populate x and y elided

x += y;

Ever few months (or so) I see something valarray would make so simple I find it truly regrettable that it's been lost and forgotten (then I think about things like slice, gslice, slice_array, indirect_array, etc., and wish I hadn't thought of it at all).

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