Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
#lets get the latest
git pull

#lets switch to branch and do some work
git checkout -b makeSomeBugs

#do the work commit
git add .
git commit -am "introducing some bugs"

#push this for my lazy remote friend to see
git push origin makeSomeBugs

#uh .. changes on master
git pull origin master

#do some work..
git commit -am "introducing some more bugs"
git push origin makeSomeBugs

#lets switch back to master
git checkout master
git pull

#work is done, lets merge
git merge --no-ff makeSomeBugs
git push origin

#and remove the branch to never ever see it again
git push origin :makeSomeBugs
git branch -d makeSomeBugs

Various blog sources (but they are quite old) say that branching like this in mercurial is no-go, especially with permanent branch removal...

share|improve this question
    
I have tried and yet to find a way to simulate a git branch workflow in mercurial. Regular branch diffidently don't work because you can't delete them (only close them but that means that branch name is taken forever). Bookmarks are supposed to be like git branches however they don't seems to really work like them, at least to me. –  ryanzec Apr 24 '12 at 17:11
1  
@ryanzec how did bookmarks fail you? –  Paul S Apr 25 '12 at 8:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I might have some bits wrong because I may have misunderstood the git, but assuming you're using a recent version of Mercurial or if not, the bookmarks extension is enabled...

# lets get the latest
# git pull

hg pull

# lets switch to branch and do some work
# git checkout -b makeSomeBugs

hg bookmark makeSomeBugs

# do the work commit
# git add .
# git commit -am "introducing some bugs"

hg commit -m "introducing some bugs"

# push this for my lazy remote friend to see
# git push origin makeSomeBugs

hg push -B makeSomeBugs

# uh .. changes on master
# git pull origin master

hg pull
hg merge

# do some work..
# git commit -am "introducing some more bugs"
# git push origin makeSomeBugs

hg commit -m "introducing some more bugs"
hg push -B makeSomeBugs

# lets switch back to master
# git checkout master
# git pull

hg pull
hg update -C <name of master rev>

# work is done, lets merge
# git merge --no-ff makeSomeBugs
# git push origin

hg merge makeSomeBugs
hg push

# and remove the branch to never ever see it again
# (I assume you mean the label not the changesets)
# git push origin :makeSomeBugs
# git branch -d makeSomeBugs

hg bookmark -d makeSomeBugs
hg push -B makeSomeBugs

There's a couple of "mental model" differences, but I think it's pretty close. Biggest one is when you delete the bookmark. You delete it locally and then push that it's deleted. Reversed order from what you did with git.

There's also the question of what you use to identify the "master" head. If there was a bookmark already on the server for it (called master for example) the first line would become hg pull -B master, the first merge hg merge master and the update hg update -C master. Once you've pulled a bookmark the first time any subsequent pulls or pushes should update it without needing to explicitly mention it.

share|improve this answer
    
So the question is, can see in history that changes made in makeSomeBugs when they are merged to default and pushed to origin are still visible as changes in makeSomeBugs ? E.g. can i track that comit X and commit Y were made in makeSomeBugs after merging? –  gerasalus Apr 25 '12 at 11:34
2  
@gerasalus: No, just like Git branches, bookmarks are not permanent. Named branches are permanent labels, and they have no Git equivalent. default refers to the default named branch. It is not the same as master. –  Laurens Holst Apr 25 '12 at 12:47
3  
@PaulS: You don’t need to enable the bookmarks extension anymore nowadays because it became a core Mercurial feature now. –  Laurens Holst Apr 25 '12 at 12:48
    
@LaurensHolst thanks, hadn't realised that. –  Paul S Apr 25 '12 at 15:25

It’s pretty much the same except that with Mercurial you generally wouldn’t bother naming your progress at all and just use an anonymous branch.

I’ll let that sink in for a moment...

Unlike git, Mercurial doesn’t ‘forget’ changesets if there is no branch name or bookmark associated with it, so there is no need for naming it, and subsequently deleting it. After this, it looks like a pretty standard workflow:

#lets get the latest
hg pull

#lets update to the latest and do some work
hg update

#do the work commit
hg commit -Am "introducing some bugs"

#serve this for my lazy remote friend to see
hg serve

#uh .. remote changes
hg pull

#do some work..
hg commit -Am "introducing some more bugs"

#lets pull in the latest
hg pull

#work is done, lets merge
hg merge
hg push

Optionally you can use a bookmark if you really want to explicitly keep track of the anonymous head; when you start (after hg update), label the current changeset using:

hg bookmark makeSomeBugs

And when you’re done (after hg merge), remove the bookmark using:

hg bookmark -d makeSomeBugs

You could also push the bookmark for your friend’s sake, but... meh.

share|improve this answer
    
You are commiting to the default, i'm commiting to the branch. This is not the same. As i can create another branch from master and do any other stuff, non related to the first one. –  gerasalus Apr 25 '12 at 11:32
2  
No, you’re committing to a new, anonymous branch, optionally with a bookmark. Branching happens whenever the line of commits diverges. If you want to commit under something else than the default name, then you need to make another named branch. You’re hitting a cultural snag here: using anonymous branches is common in Mercurial, while it is pretty much impossible in Git. Named branches are permanent and need to be set in advance; if you want to track that anonymous branch, you use a bookmark. –  Laurens Holst Apr 25 '12 at 12:29
    
In Mercurial, named branches are permanent and typically used to track releases. You can use them to track features too, but usually feature work is done in anonymous branches. Bookmarks can optionally be used to track work on anonymous branches. This is useful if you are working on multiple things at once or the code needs to be shared before merging it back. –  Laurens Holst Apr 25 '12 at 12:36
1  
Named branches are nice for tracking releases because then in the project history you can see what release changesets were for. However for feature work they are often inconvenient, e.g. because you can’t be bothered to come up with a branch name, or you’ve already made a few commits before you realising that you want to label them, or (like in your question) you don’t want the label to persist. So that is why features are usually done on anonymous branches, sprinkled with some bookmarks (or separate clones) as needed. –  Laurens Holst Apr 25 '12 at 12:43
    
Ok it seems that i'm hiting a big cultural snag. If you have not used any bookmarks, and have issued a commit for Bug X how can you start working on Bug Y but exclude thet commit from Bug X ? I think this is possible only if i use bookmarks (considering that i do not use named branches for their permanent nature) –  gerasalus Apr 25 '12 at 13:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.