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I am newbie in Google App Engine. While I was going through the tutorial, I found several things that we do in php-mysql is not available in GAE. For example in dataStore auto increment feature is not available. Also I am confused about session management in GAE. Over all I am confused and can not visualize the whole thing.

Please advise me a simple user management system with user registration, user login, user logout, session (create,manage,destroy) with data Store. Also please advise me where I can get simple but effective examples.

Thanks in advance.

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3 Answers

I tend to use my own user and session manangement

For my web handlers I will attach a decorator called session and one called authorize. The session decorator will attach a session to every request, and the authorize decorator will make sure that the user is authorised.

(A word of caution, the authorize decorator is specific to how I develop my applications - the username being the first parameter in most requests).

So for example a web handler may look like:

class UserProfile(webapp.RequestHandler):
  @session
  @authorize
  def get(self, user):
     # Do some funky stuff
     # The session is attached to the self object.
     someObjectAttachedToSession = self.SessionObj.SomeStuff
     self.response.out.write("hello %s" % user)

In the above code, the session decorator attaches some session stuff that I need based on the cookies that are present on the request. The authorize header will make sure that the user can only access the page if the session is the correct one.

The decorators code are below:

import functools
from model import Session
import logging

def authorize(redirectTo = "/"):
    def factory(method):
        'Ensures that when an auth cookie is presented to the request that is is valid'
        @functools.wraps(method)
        def wrapper(self, *args, **kwargs):

            #Get the session parameters
            auth_id = self.request.cookies.get('auth_id', '')
            session_id = self.request.cookies.get('session_id', '')

            #Check the db for the session
            session = Session.GetSession(session_id, auth_id)           

            if session is None:
                self.redirect(redirectTo)
                return
            else:
                if session.settings is None:
                    self.redirect(redirectTo)
                    return

                username = session.settings.key().name()

                if len(args) > 0:               
                    if username != args[0]:
                        # The user is allowed to view this page.
                        self.redirect(redirectTo)
                        return

            result = method(self, *args, **kwargs)

            return result
        return wrapper
    return factory

def session(method):
    'Ensures that the sessions object (if it exists) is attached to the request.'
    @functools.wraps(method)
    def wrapper(self, *args, **kwargs):

        #Get the session parameters
        auth_id = self.request.cookies.get('auth_id', '')
        session_id = self.request.cookies.get('session_id', '')

        #Check the db for the session
        session = Session.GetSession(session_id, auth_id)           

        if session is None:
            session = Session()
            session.session_id = Session.MakeId()
            session.auth_token = Session.MakeId()
            session.put()

        # Attach the session to the method
        self.SessionObj = session           

        #Call the handler.          
        result = method(self, *args, **kwargs)

        self.response.headers.add_header('Set-Cookie', 'auth_id=%s; path=/; HttpOnly' % str(session.auth_token))
        self.response.headers.add_header('Set-Cookie', 'session_id=%s; path=/; HttpOnly' % str(session.session_id))

        return result
    return wrapper

def redirect(method, redirect = "/user/"):
    'When a known user is logged in redirect them to their home page'
    @functools.wraps(method)
    def wrapper(self, *args, **kwargs):
        try:    
            if self.SessionObj is not None:
                if self.SessionObj.settings is not None:
                    # Check that the session is correct
                    username = self.SessionObj.settings.key().name()

                    self.redirect(redirect + username)
                    return
        except:
            pass
        return method(self, *args, **kwargs)
    return wrapper
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Thanks a lot! It makes sense. However I am troubled all day long if I will have to integrate django just for own user management. As far I get it , webapp only supports google users and all sort of support for that. Any help or advice on this? Can I simply do that without going for Django? –  fireball003 Jun 23 '09 at 17:44
1  
The above code isn't dependent on the Google Users, so you lose some ease of development but you get more control - none of the above requires Django... - All my user management is done without Googles User API (that is for twollo.com, ff.amplifeeder.com etc). I only use Django for template rendering at the moment so there is no requirement for Django either. –  Kinlan Jun 23 '09 at 20:50
    
is this still the preferred way for a customer user management? how is the Session - object implemented, in particular the MakeId() function? –  Martin Kapfhammer Jan 25 '13 at 21:35
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Django is your best bet -- with the version I pointed you to, auth and sessions should both "just work" as per the Django docs. this article gives simple instructions and example of how to proceed from there.

For Django sessions, see here; for Django auth, here.

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Though I have used Django-on-AppEngine, I would not advocate ignoring appengines builtin auth over django. Any reason that you do? (Yes, I use Django outside of appengine too) –  ironfroggy Jun 23 '09 at 2:24
1  
GAE's "builtin auth" only supports Google accounts, and in particular does not support "user registration", which the question very specifically requires (that's also why I didn't even bother suggesting OpenID this time -- last few times I did the askers saw it apparently as an attack on their desire to deal with their own user registration!-). –  Alex Martelli Jun 23 '09 at 2:36
    
Users can register against the app specifically the first time they log in with their Google (or OpenId) credentials. –  Nick Johnson Jun 23 '09 at 11:57
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You don't write user management and registration and all that, because you use Google's own authentication services. This is all included in the App Engine documentation.

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So, my user have to use Google username? Can't they register only into my website? So, what will happen for user registration? –  fireball003 Jun 23 '09 at 3:00
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