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I have a function in bash that outputs a bunch of lines to stdout. I want to combine them into a single line with some delimiter between them.

Before:

one 
two 
three 

After:

one:two:three   

What is an easy way to do this?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Use paste

$ echo -e 'one\ntwo\nthree' | paste -s -d':'
one:two:three
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that's the correct answer. I knew it there was some simple function kicking around to do exactly that. –  Shep Apr 24 '12 at 18:24

This might work for you:

paste -sd':' file
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For fun, here's a bash-only way:

echo $'one\n2 and 3\nfour' | { mapfile -t lines; IFS=:; echo "${lines[*]}"; }

outputs

one:2 and 3:four

The {} grouping is to ensure all the commands that refer to the array variable are executed in the same subshell. The variable will not exist once the pipeline ends.

http://www.gnu.org/software/bash/manual/bashref.html#index-mapfile-140

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Taking @glennJackman's corrections verbatim

awk '{printf("%s%s", sep, $0); sep=":"} END {print ""}' file

Or as you specified bash

while read line ; do printf "%s:" $line ; done < file | sed s'/:$//'

I hope this helps

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Interesting point... are awk/paste/grep etc not considered part of bash? –  Shep Apr 24 '12 at 18:27
    
it all depends on your perspective. bash is a shell. awk/paste/grep etc work inside of any Unix-based shell: ash, bash, dash, ksh, rc, sh, zsh, et.al ;-) –  shellter Apr 24 '12 at 18:30
    
These solutions emit a trailing colon. To avoid it, you could pipe into sed to remove it, or do something like: awk '{printf("%s%s", sep, $0); sep=":"} END {print ""}' –  glenn jackman Apr 24 '12 at 18:33

And another way:

cat file | tr -s "\n" ":"
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Input.txt

one
two
three

Perl Solution : dummy.pl

 @a = `cat /home/Input.txt`;
    foreach my $x (@a)
    {
            chomp($x);
            push(@array,"$x");
    }
    chomp(@array);
    print "@array";

Run the script as :

$> perl dummy.pl | sed 's/ /:/g' > Output.txt

Output.txt

one:two:three

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