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using (SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection())
{
     try
     {
          con.Open();
     }
     catch (Exception ex)
     {
          MessageBox.Show(ex.Message);
     }
}

This works fine. But I want to know can we handle exception without using try catch like some thing if else? or is it mendetory to use try catch

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@Henk Holterman: is this question is really bad, that you give it -ve vote? looking for alternative is bad? –  jams Apr 24 '12 at 19:31
1  
@Henk. I agree... There is an overall problem with anyone being able to ask theory, strategy, or performance questions on stack overflow. I tend to ask them on programmers instead now where they are better received. –  KingOfHypocrites Apr 24 '12 at 19:47
    
I don't think the down votes are entirely fair on this question. It's a perfectly legitimate question to ask. –  Steven C. Britton May 13 at 22:40
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6 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There is no other mechanism to handle an exception other than try catch. It sounds like you want something like

if(connection.DidAnErrorOccur)

but that doesn't exist.

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Only way is to check for all the conditions that would return an error. You should be doing this anyway. Try/catch is expensive. Try catch should be a last resort and there is no way around it for that purpose.

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1  
Unless you are developing a real time system (even this can be discussed) then no, Try/Catch are not expensive at all. Run a benchmark and you will see for yourself. –  GETah Apr 24 '12 at 19:02
1  
Using try/catch can affect compiler optimization and what programmer would use try/catch over doing something as simple as checking for null. It is just bad practice. Catching an exception will always be slower than doing a simple check. I'm not saying doing use them but don't use them in place of defensive programming. –  KingOfHypocrites Apr 24 '12 at 19:45
    
Right, good point! +1, you deserve it. –  GETah Apr 24 '12 at 22:23
    
Try/Catch are expensive because you have to build the exception. Asking the customer to buy the newest Titanium server is just a bad idea. Most of the time it's better to not use them, while some can't be helped. It's a lot easier to test an Integer value than build another class chain and report it. –  Nick Turner Aug 7 '13 at 19:02
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The best alternative I can give you is Elmah. http://code.google.com/p/elmah/ It will handle all your uncaught errors and log them. From there I would suggest fixing said errors or catching the specific errors you expect and not just catch any error that might occur. This is best to do so you can fix potential problems and not simply skip over code because an exception occurred.

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Tejs' answer is correct, I believe there is no other mechanism to handle errors.

You can, however, handle more specific errors. You can also declare variables outside the try catch to see if it succeeded.

Example:

using (SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection())
{
     bool sqlErrorOccurred;

     try
     {
         con.Open();
         sqlErrorOccurred = false;
     }
     catch (SqlException ex)
     {
          sqlErrorOccurred = true;
     }

     if(sqlErrorOccurred)
     {
         MessageBox.Show("A Sql Exception Occurred");
     }
}
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How does this get rid of the try/catch? –  GETah Apr 24 '12 at 19:09
    
Your messagebox could go right in the catch statement. Just more code to do the same thing. –  KingOfHypocrites Apr 24 '12 at 19:48
    
I am simply illustrating concepts - this is not code you would use. As KingOfHypocrites said, you can put the messagebox in the catch statement. But there are far more complex things you couldn't just put in the catch statement. –  Scen Apr 25 '12 at 17:59
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The answers above are correct. However, one additional thing to note is that it is possible to set up a global exception handler. This doesn't solve the need for defensive coding as previously mentioned. However, if there are concerns that all exceptions need to be handled (for example, to log the error), then this approach can be very helpful.

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I'm building a system that uses real-time streaming data, and needs, therefore, to handle errors that could occur when everything else is pretty much idle. The API I'm using passes the errors back through to the program though a method named "error", with the exception attached. This method could then throw the error, but that is problematic, because I can't see how putting my whole program entirely within a try-catch block is a good idea.

So, to get around it, I'll set up an event handler to fire the event in the main part of my program, which can then deal with whatever error gets thrown at that point in time.

For example:

In the main class:

private void Error(object sender, EventArgs e) {

    Exception ex = sender as Exception;

    Console.WriteLine("Error: " + ex); // Or whatever you want to do with the exception

    // You could even add this if you want to then use the try -catch sequence (which 
    // makes the exception easier to parse and also enables you to stop the program
    // with unhandled exceptions if it's something catastrophic:

    try {

        throw ex;
    } catch (put.your.exception.detail.here) {

        // do stuff
   } finally {

       // do other stuff
   }
}

(In the class that receives the error from the API):

class Foo {
    public event EventHandler ThrowError;

    protected virtual void OnError(Object src, EventArgs e) {

        if (ThrowError != null) {

            ThrowError(src, e);
        }
    }

    private virtual void error(Exception e) {

        OnError(e, EventArgs.Empty);
    }
}
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