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I have two files. File A has a list of words, one on each line. File B contains another huge list of words, but some are quite long. How would I use sed or awk to take each line from file A and combine it with each line in file B that isn't longer that 6 characters? It would ideally spit out all the results in a new file.

For example:

File A:

cool
beans
sad

File B:

armadillo
snake
bread

New File:

coolsnake
coolbread
beanssnake
beanbread
sadsnake
sadbread
share|improve this question
    
is this homework? –  lesmana Apr 24 '12 at 19:17
2  
@lesmana, nope. I'm trying desperately to create a cool word. –  maxmackie Apr 24 '12 at 19:22

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Not same order that your output, but could be useful:

awk '
  FNR == NR { 
    words[ $1 ] = 1; 
      next 
  } 
  FNR < NR { 
    if ( length( $1 ) <= 6 ) 
      for ( word in words ) { 
        print word $0 
       } 
  }
' fileA fileB

Output:

coolsnake
sadsnake
beanssnake
coolbread
sadbread
beansbread
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#!/bin/bash

while read line1; do
 while read line2;do
   [[ $(echo $line2 | wc -c) -lt 7 ]] && \
   echo $line1$line2
 done < './B.txt'
done < './A.txt'

something like that, just fit it for yourself it gives me:

coolsnake
coolbread
beanssnake
beansbread
sadsnake
sadbread
share|improve this answer
2  
+1 but prefer [[ ${#line2} -lt 7 ]] && echo $line1$line2 for string length comparison. –  anubhava Apr 24 '12 at 19:41
    
yeah, it's better, and probably faster. –  remort Apr 24 '12 at 19:46
    
@anubhava: In Bash, it's preferred to use this form for integer comparisons: (( ${#line2} < 7 )). –  Dennis Williamson Apr 24 '12 at 21:27
    
@DennisWilliamson: Agreed, that form of numeric expression/comparison is even better. –  anubhava Apr 25 '12 at 6:46

This might work for you:

sed 's|.*|sed "/......./d;s/.*/&\&/" fileB|' fileA | sh

With GNU sed:

sed 's|.*|sed "/......./d;s/.*/&\&/" fileB|e' fileA
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One way using perl:

Content of script.pl:

use warnings;
use strict;

die qq[Usage: perl $0 <fileA> <fileB>\n] unless @ARGV == 2;

open my $fh, q[<], pop or die $!;

my @words = map { chomp; $_ } grep { length( $_ ) <= 6 } <$fh>;

while ( <> ) {
    chomp;
    for my $word ( @words ) {
        printf qq[%s\n], $_ . $word;
    }
}

Run it like:

perl script.pl fileA fileB 

With following output:

coolsnake
coolbread
beanssnake
beansbread
sadsnake
sadbread
share|improve this answer

with bash:

mapfile -t shortwords < <(sed -r 's/.{7,}/d' B.txt)
while read word; do
  for suffix in "${shortwords[@]}"; do
    echo "$word$suffix"
  done
done < A.txt
share|improve this answer
    
Requires Bash 4. –  Dennis Williamson Apr 24 '12 at 21:27

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