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Using simple injector with the command pattern described here. Most commands have companion classes that implement fluent validation's AbstractValidator<TCommand>, which means they also implement FV IValidator<TCommand>. However it doesn't always make sense to have a validator implementation for every command.

As far as I can tell, the command decorator implementation cannot take IValidator<TCommand> as a constructor arg unless every ICommandHandler<TCommand> has a corresponding FV.IValidator<TCommand>. I tried the following:

public class FluentValidationCommandDecorator<TCommand> 
    : IHandleCommands<TCommand>
{
    public FluentValidationCommandDecorator(IHandleCommands<TCommand> decorated
        , IValidator<TCommand> validator
    )
    {
        _decorated = decorated;
        _validator = validator;
    }
    ...
}
...
container.RegisterManyForOpenGeneric(typeof(IValidator<>), assemblies);
container.RegisterDecorator(typeof(IHandleCommands<>),
    typeof(FluentValidationCommandDecorator<>),
    context =>
    {
        var validatorType =
            typeof (IValidator<>).MakeGenericType(
                context.ServiceType.GetGenericArguments());
        if (container.GetRegistration(validatorType) == null)
            return false;
        return true;
    });

Unit tests that run Container.Verify() once, pass. Unit tests that run Container.Verify() more than once, fail from an InvalidOperationException on the second invocation:

The configuration is invalid. Creating the instance for type 
IValidator<SomeCommandThatHasNoValidatorImplementation> failed. Object reference
not set to  an instance of an object.

The following works, by taking the Container as an argument:

public class FluentValidationCommandDecorator<TCommand> 
    : IHandleCommands<TCommand>
{
    private readonly IHandleCommands<TCommand> _decorated;
    private readonly Container _container;

    public FluentValidationCommandDecorator(Container container
        , IHandleCommands<TCommand> decorated
    )
    {
        _container = container;
        _decorated = decorated;
    }

    public void Handle(TCommand command)
    {
        IValidator<TCommand> validator = null;
        if (_container.GetRegistration(typeof(IValidator<TCommand>)) != null)
            validator = _container.GetInstance<IValidator<TCommand>>();

        if (validator != null) validator.ValidateAndThrow(command);

        _decorated.Handle(command);
    }
}
...
container.RegisterManyForOpenGeneric(typeof(IValidator<>), assemblies);
container.RegisterDecorator(typeof(IHandleCommands<>),
    typeof(FluentValidationCommandDecorator<>));

If this class didn't have to take a dependency on Simple Injector, I could move it into the domain project. The domain already takes a dependency on FluentValidation.net so that domain validity can be unit tested. I think this decorator belongs in the domain, but neither it nor its unit test project takes a dependency on simpleinjector (or should have to, since the domain is not the composition root).

Is there a way to tell simpleinjector to only decorate a CommandHandler<TCommand> instance with a FluentValidationCommandDecorator<TCommand> if there is an implementation registered for IValidator<TCommand>?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What you need is unregistered type resolution, to map missing types to a default implementation. Or in other words, you need to use the RegisterOpenGeneric method:

container.RegisterOpenGeneric(typeof(IValidator<>), 
    typeof(NullValidator<>));

Now you need to define a NullValidator<T> that implements IValidator<T> with an empty / default implementation.

When you do this every time a certain (unregistered) IValidator<T> is requested, a new instance of NullValidator<T> will be returned. It will not override types that are registered using RegisterManyForOpenGeneric, since those types are explictly registered.

When the NullValidator<T> implementation is thread-safe (which will usually be the case with a empty implementation), you can optimize construction by registering them as singleton:

container.RegisterSingleOpenGeneric(typeof(IValidator<>), 
    typeof(NullValidator<>));

You can read more information in the wiki: Registration of open generic types

share|improve this answer
    
Unregistered type resolution, got it. It seems that the NullValidator<> does belong in the same lib with simpleinjector, but this allows me to move the decorator out. My NullValidator just inherits fluentvalidation's AbstractValidator<T> -- no constructors, fields, nothing -- and from what I can tell is thread-safe, so am registering it as a single. –  danludwig Apr 24 '12 at 21:20
    
Another side-effect of this seems to be that the commands which DO have IValidator<TCommand> implementations are decorated twice -- once with the real implementation, and once with the NullValidator. Is this to be expected? –  danludwig Apr 24 '12 at 21:27
    
I'm not sure why you should have the NullValidator to be a decorator. I'm not sure what you are doing. Can you update your question with your current code and configuration? –  Steven Apr 25 '12 at 7:14
    
You are right, the commands with specific validators are not being decorated twice. I have 2 similarly named commands, 1 with a specific validator, and 1 without. I was misreading the debugger watch, and thought that 1 command was being decorated twice, when in fact the command decorated with the NullValidator did not have the same TCommand type as the one being decorated with a specific validator. Sorry for the confusion. –  danludwig Apr 25 '12 at 12:15
    
Visual Studio and .NET displays generic types in an awful format. This bugs me a lot, and that's why I display generic type names in a more friendly format in the Simple Injector exception messages. –  Steven Apr 25 '12 at 12:27

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