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I have the following 2 tables defined in a SQL Server database:

  CREATE TABLE [dbo].[FinancialItem](
    [Id][bigint] identity(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [TranId] [int] NOT NULL,
    [Installment][int] NOT NULL,
    [Amount][decimal](16,2) NOT NULL
   CONSTRAINT [FinancialItem0] PRIMARY KEY
   (
     [Id] ASC
   )

  CREATE TABLE [dbo].[FinancialItemHistory](
    [Id][bigint] NOT NULL,
    [TranId] [int] NOT NULL,
    [Installment][int] NOT NULL,
    [Amount][decimal](16,2) NOT NULL
   CONSTRAINT [FinancialItemHistory0] PRIMARY KEY
   (
     [Id] ASC
   )

I am using Entity Framework 4.x with POCO entities.

The Entity Framework code does not write any data to the database, it is simply there to read data created by another service. What I would like to do is have one entity represent BOTH of these tables if possible. The FinancialItem and FinancialItemHistory tables have the same structure. When a FinancialItem gets paid off, the record moves from the FinancialItem table to the FinancialItemHistory table (which keeps the same Id). Is there a way in Entity Framework to conditionally pull in the FinancialItemHistory records if I am including paid off items? Should I create a View in the database that essentially does this:

SELECT Id, TranId, Installment, Amount, 0 IsHistorical
FROM FinancialItem
UNION ALL
SELECT Id, TranId, Installment, Amount, 1 IsHistorical
FROM FinancialItemHistory

I would like to avoid using a view if possible because more times than not I will simply want to pull the unpaid items that reside in the FinancialItem table. I tried having both entities derive from the same interface (IFinancialItem) and then have Entity Framework query that interface, but it appears that Entity Framework does not support mapping to complex types within the context of an IQueryable.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In entity framework, you do a union all using the Concat method. If you want to union two different types, you need to convert both to a common type first like this:

var table1 = ...;
var table1 = ...;
var unionAll = table1.Select(x => new { x.ID, ... }).Concat(table2.Select(x => new { x.ID, ... }));
share|improve this answer
    
Right, but doesn't that imply that both FinancialItemHistory and FinancialItem are of the same type? –  Rob Packwood Apr 24 '12 at 20:12
    
Right. I added the solution. –  usr Apr 24 '12 at 20:13
    
What if I need to define a single WHERE clause on the query that will then filter both FinancialItem and FinancialItemHistory? Is that possible without bringing literally all of the table data into memory and then doing the type conversion and then the filter? –  Rob Packwood Apr 24 '12 at 20:19
    
Just put the where at the end. SQL Server will push the predicate down to the base tables. SQL Servers query optimizer rocks. –  usr Apr 24 '12 at 20:38
    
Ahhh I see, the problem was that I was trying to use a common interface (IFinancialItem) and was doing this: table1.Select(x => new FinancialItem { x.Id, ... } as IFinancialItem).Concat(table2.Select(x => new FinancialItem { x.Id, ... } as IFinancialItem)); Entity framework doesn't support me attempting to convert to the interface at that point in time. I will use your suggestion and will concat a concrete type and let SQL figure it out. Thanks! –  Rob Packwood Apr 24 '12 at 21:11

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