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In my website, I have a few CSS classes that set a fixed type of cursor when you mouse over them. I want to set the cursor to the wait image when I make an AJAX call anywhere on the page and then have it revert back to whatever cursor it should be after the AJAX call is complete.

I tried:

$(document).ajaxStart(function () {
    document.body.style.cursor = 'wait';
});

$(document).ajaxStop(function () {
    document.body.style.cursor = 'auto';
});

This doesn't work when my mouse is over a DOM object with a CSS class that changes the cursor and I'm stumped on how to make it do so.

Currently I have a class:

.pills a:hover
{
    background-color: #0069D6;
    color: #FFFFFF;
    text-shadow: 0 1px 1px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.25);
    text-decoration:none;
    cursor:pointer;
}

If you mouse over the object in this class, and an Ajax call starts, the cursor still stays as a pointer.

share|improve this question
    
cursor style acts upon the element which it is currently on (mouseover) and If the specific element has a different style then that element cursor will be show as it is above the body element. One alternative I could think of is to show an overlay on the whole document and set the cursor for the over to wait and hide on ajaxStop. –  Vega Apr 24 '12 at 20:24
    
FWIW, from a straight UX perspective, you really shouldn't be messing with the cursor in the first place unless it's to indicate that something is clickable. if you're waiting for something to return via ajax, you should be including a spinner. see ajaxload.info –  Jason Apr 24 '12 at 20:34

4 Answers 4

up vote 20 down vote accepted

You can use a combination of toggling a class on the body and !important.

http://jsfiddle.net/UGwmv/2/

$("button").click(function(){
   $("body").toggleClass("wait");
   return false; 
});
body.wait, body.wait *{
    cursor: wait !important;   
}

When body has the wait class, everything will show the wait cursor.

share|improve this answer
    
The cursor isn't affected below the toggle button. At least not in my web browser (FireFox). –  Robin Castlin Apr 24 '12 at 20:31
    
I believe that's just a consequence of the way jsfiddle is set up. –  James Montagne Apr 24 '12 at 20:33
    
@RobinCastlin Updated the fiddle. A 100% height on the body fixes that. Not sure if it would be an issue in a real page outside of jsfiddle. –  James Montagne Apr 24 '12 at 20:37

if you have a wrapper or container:

<script type="text/javascript">
$(document).ajaxStart(function () {
    document.body.style.cursor = 'wait';
    $('div#wrapper').addClass('wait');
});

$(document).ajaxStop(function () {
    document.body.style.cursor = 'auto';
    $('div#wrapper').removeClass('wait');
});
</script>

<style type="text/css">
    div#wrapper.wait * {
        cursor: wait !important;
    }
</style>

Basicly all children to the wrapper will get the cursor: wait with the !important condition.

share|improve this answer
    
Worth noting that !important declarations can cause issues on IE versions –  gillesc Apr 24 '12 at 20:37
    
@gillesc What sort of issues. I know of one for IE6 but didn't think there were any issues with current versions. –  James Montagne Apr 24 '12 at 20:39
    
reference.sitepoint.com/css/importantdeclarations - apart from IE6 the other are minor edge cases "Internet Explorer 6 and 7 give importance to a declaration when an illegal identifier is used in place of the keyword important, instead of ignoring the declaration as they should." and "In Internet Explorer 8, the importance declaration is ignored if the selector contains a :first-letter or :first-line pseudo-element." –  gillesc Apr 24 '12 at 20:41

The problem is that the class will overwrite the document value for the cursor, to do avoid this you should make sure all element when hovered will show the wait symbol.

Your best bet is to add a class to the body element when you want the wait symbol for the mouse, that way from CSS when that class is present you set all other classes to show the wait symbol.

When ajax is finished remove the class from the body tag and the original elements class with various cursor style will be reverted.

$(document).ajaxStart(function () {
    $('body').addClass('wait');
});

$(document).ajaxStop(function () {
    $('body').removeClass('wait');
});



<style type="text/css">
    body.wait .move {
        cursor: wait;
    }
</style>
share|improve this answer

an other answer 2014:

solution if you have at least one style sheet, change it!

change the CSS Style sheet:

sh = document.styleSheets[0]
Wait_a_bit="* {cursor: wait !important}"
sh.insertRule(Wait_a_bit, 0)

before your ajax and remove it afterward:

sh.deleteRule(0)
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