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I have come accross something that at first view seems to be a bug in Gorm (grails 1.3.7). I thought I'd post the problem here before going for the jira issue, in case I'm getting it wrong.

Here's the issue:

I have one domain class, it refers to a parent object of the same class, and also can have a pointer to an alias, also of the same domain class.

This is the domain class:

class Mydomain {
    String name
    Mydomain alias
    Mydomain parent
    Mydomain foo

    static constraints = {
        parent(nullable: true)
        alias(nullable: true)
        foo(nullable: true)
    }
}

If I execute the following script:

Mydomain.list()*.delete()
def one=new Mydomain(name:'one').save()
new Mydomain(name:'two', parent:one).save()

Mydomain.list().each{
    println it.name
    println "parent:${it.parent?.name}"
    println "alias:${it.alias?.name}"
    println "foo:${it.foo?.name}"
    println "============================"
}    

I get the following result:

one
parent:null
alias:two
foo:null
============================
two
parent:one
alias:null
foo:null
============================

This means that when I set two.parent=one, gorm goes and sets one.alias=two.

I guess that gorm does this because it infers that there is a bidirectional relationship between one and two, and then sets the first property of class Mydomain of object one to the reference of two.

I can see this sort of behaviour working with bidirectional relationships between Author and Book (assuming that an author only writes one book of course), but in my case this is dangerous, becaus gorm goes and overwrites a relationship that has nothing to do with this.

So my question would be, how do I tell GORM to treat this as unidirectional nullable relationships?

Thanks for any ideas

Update: Business case

This is the business case that I am trying to model. A company has a name, and can have subsidiaries, warehouses, local offices, etc. This is modeled with the help of the parent relationship, effectively creating a tree of Companies:

class Company {
    String name
    Company parent
}

Now, the representation of this organizational structure is not the same for everyone, some people may not care about the office level, or event the group level. This is why a company can have an alias in a parallel representation. It is still the same company, can have a different name, but you would like to be able to navigate between these parallel tree organizations via the alias relationship.

class Company {
    String name
    Company parent
    Company alias
}

So yes, there are multiple relationships to self, but they have very distinct meanings, and I understand that GORM uses the most frequent simple case as a default, but I am really trying everything I can in the DSL to instruct GORM to do the right thing, but unsuccessfully.

The conventional way of doing this would be to add a bidirectional one-to-many relationship, with a mappedBy directive:

class Company {
    String name
    Company alias

    static belongsTo=[parent:Company]
    static hasMany=[children:Company]
    static mappedBy=[children:'parent']
}

But in many GORM articles this idiom is discouraged, because of severe performance issues. That is why I want an unidirectional relationship

Company ---(parent)---> Company
share|improve this question
    
You have create 3 self relationships here. That is how GORM perceives it. –  Sagar V Apr 25 '12 at 8:58
    
I have explained the business case –  loteq Apr 25 '12 at 10:03
    
JIRA submitted: jira.grails.org/browse/GRAILS-9062 –  loteq Apr 26 '12 at 9:25
add comment

2 Answers

Shouldn't there be appropriate constraints used here? Just wondering, since I made the following change and now the output is different

class Mydomain {
    String name
    Mydomain alias
    Mydomain foo

    static belongsTo = [parent:Mydomain]

    static constraints = {
        parent(nullable: true)
        alias(nullable: true)
        foo(nullable:true)
    }
}

The test output (maybe this is what you were expecting)

one
null
null
============================
two
null
null
============================

If you could give some more details about your domain scenario we could expand upon this. Else, GORM, the way I see it, is automatically setting the cardinality since no constraint was specified.

Disclaimer: I'm using Grails 2.0.1

UPDATED (26/04/12): Considering the business case does remodeling as show below work for you?

class Mydomain {
    String name

    static belongsTo = [parent:Mydomain]

    static constraints = {
        parent(nullable: true)
    }
}

class MydomainAlias {

    Mydomain me 
    Mydomain alias

    static constraints = {
        me (unique: 'alias')
    }
}

Essentially, this isolates the aliasing to a different table. Grails automatically generates the foreign key dependencies for you. A sample schema-export looks like this

create table mydomain (id bigint not null auto_increment, version bigint not null, name varchar(255) not null, parent_id bigint, primary key (id));
create table mydomain_alias (id bigint not null auto_increment, version bigint not null, alias_id bigint not null, me_id bigint not null, primary key (id), unique (alias_id, me_id));
alter table mydomain add index FKECA5F170DF99DE64 (parent_id), add constraint FKECA5F170DF99DE64 foreign key (parent_id) references mydomain (id);
alter table mydomain_alias add index FKA70D16C16A628AB6 (me_id), add constraint FKA70D16C16A628AB6 foreign key (me_id) references mydomain (id);
alter table mydomain_alias add index FKA70D16C1CA5FA6FE (alias_id), add constraint FKA70D16C1CA5FA6FE foreign key (alias_id) references mydomain (id);
share|improve this answer
    
this looks strange, if the example worked as expected, two.parent sould == one, not null! I tried your belongsTo constraint in grails 1.3.7 and still got the same error as above: one {parent==null, alias==two, foo==null), two {parent==null, alias==null, foo==null} –  loteq Apr 25 '12 at 9:52
    
I will try in grails 2.0.1 and get back here. Thanks a lot for taking the time to check this out! –  loteq Apr 25 '12 at 9:54
    
I will expand my question to clarify the business case. –  loteq Apr 25 '12 at 9:55
    
Just tried my example above (modified for more clarity) in grails 2.0.1 and got the same result as in 1.3.7, even with the added belongsTo directive. Could you please take the trouble to paste the clarified test case again in your project? –  loteq Apr 25 '12 at 10:16
    
I have used the same script that you have pasted above. No modifications for that one. –  Sagar V Apr 25 '12 at 17:10
show 7 more comments
up vote 0 down vote accepted

After posting a JIRA issue http://jira.grails.org/browse/GRAILS-9062?focusedCommentId=70641#comment-70641

and some exchanges in the mailing list,

http://markmail.org/message/xcmcclr2lv7ecrbn

The solution was suggested by Graeme Rocher.

Just add the following mappedBy closure

static mappedBy = [
    parent: 'null',
    alias:'null',
    foo:'null'
]

This will instruct GORM not to make the assumption that a bidirectional relationship is needed.

Thanks to all for your expert help!

share|improve this answer
    
I tried this with Grails 2.1.0, but it raises an exception: org.codehaus.groovy.grails.exceptions.GrailsDomainException: Non-existent mapping property [null] specified for property [parent] in class [class Mydomain]. Is this still allowed? –  tuler Jul 21 '12 at 1:45
    
Would you please add a comment to the jira issue and document your case? –  loteq Aug 1 '12 at 3:46
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