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do you know a quick/elegant Python/Scipy/Numpy solution for the following problem: You have a set of x, y coordinates with associated values w (all 1D arrays). Now bin x and y onto a 2D grid (size BINSxBINS) and calculate quantiles (like the median) of the w values for each bin, which should at the end result in a BINSxBINS 2D array with the required quantiles.

This is easy to do with some nested loop,but I am sure there is a more elegant solution.

Thanks, Mark

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is what I came up with, I hope it's useful. It's not necessarily cleaner or better than using a loop, but maybe it'll get you started toward something better.

import numpy as np
bins_x, bins_y = 1., 1.
x = np.array([1,1,2,2,3,3,3])
y = np.array([1,1,2,2,3,3,3])
w = np.array([1,2,3,4,5,6,7], 'float')

# You can get a bin number for each point like this
x = (x // bins_x).astype('int')
y = (y // bins_y).astype('int')
shape = [x.max()+1, y.max()+1]
bin = np.ravel_multi_index([x, y], shape)

# You could get the mean by doing something like:
mean = np.bincount(bin, w) / np.bincount(bin)

# Median is a bit harder
order = bin.argsort()
bin = bin[order]
w = w[order]
edges = (bin[1:] != bin[:-1]).nonzero()[0] + 1
med_index = (np.r_[0, edges] + np.r_[edges, len(w)]) // 2
median = w[med_index]

# But that's not quite right, so maybe
median2 = [np.median(i) for i in np.split(w, edges)]

Also take a look at numpy.histogram2d

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thanks, this looks already good. but it seems the median part is not fully correct. e.g. order is defined in the wrong line. –  Mark Apr 24 '12 at 22:59
    
Yes you're right. –  Bi Rico Apr 24 '12 at 23:16
    
Using np.histogram2d you can very easily do binning by mean, but not by median though. –  neo May 23 at 21:13

I'm just trying to do this myself and it sound like you want the command "scipy.stats.binned_statistic_2d" from you can find the mean, median, standard devation or any defined function for the third parameter given the bins.

I realise this question has already been answered but I believe this is a good built in solution.

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thanks a lot for your code. Based on it I found the following solution of my problem (only a minor modification of your code):

import numpy as np
BINS=10
boxsize=10.0
bins_x, bins_y = boxsize/BINS, boxsize/BINS
x = np.array([0,0,0,1,1,1,2,2,2,3,3,3])
y = np.array([0,0,0,1,1,1,2,2,2,3,3,3])
w = np.array([0,1,2,0,1,2,0,1,2,0,1,2], 'float')

# You can get a bin number for each point like this
x = (x // bins_x).astype('int')
y = (y // bins_y).astype('int')
shape = [BINS, BINS]
bin = np.ravel_multi_index([x, y], shape)


# Median 
order = bin.argsort()
bin = bin[order]
w = w[order]
edges = (bin[1:] != bin[:-1]).nonzero()[0] + 1
median = [np.median(i) for i in np.split(w, edges)]

#construct BINSxBINS matrix with median values
binvals=np.unique(bin)
medvals=np.zeros([BINS*BINS])
medvals[binvals]=median
medvals=medvals.reshape([BINS,BINS])

print medvals
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With numpy/scipy it goes like this:

    import numpy as np
    import scipy.stats as stats

    x = np.random.uniform(0,200,100)
    y = np.random.uniform(0,200,100)
    w = np.random.uniform(1,10,100)

    h = np.histogram2d(x,y,bins=[10,10], weights=w,range=[[0,200],[0,200]])
    hist, bins_x, bins_y = h
    q = stats.mstats.mquantiles(hist,prob=[0.25, 0.5, 0.75])

    >>> q.round(2)
    array([ 512.8 ,  555.41,  592.73])

    q1 = np.where(hist<q[0],1,0)
    q2 = np.where(np.logical_and(q[0]<=hist,hist<q[1]),2,0)
    q3 = np.where(np.logical_and(q[1]<=hist,hist<=q[2]),3,0)
    q4 = np.where(q[2]<hist,4,0)

    >>>q1 + q2 + q3 + q4
    array([[4, 3, 4, 3, 1, 1, 4, 3, 1, 2],
   [1, 1, 4, 4, 2, 3, 1, 3, 3, 3],
   [2, 3, 3, 2, 2, 2, 3, 2, 4, 2],
   [2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 1, 2, 2, 1, 4],
   [1, 3, 1, 4, 2, 1, 3, 1, 1, 3],
   [4, 2, 2, 1, 2, 1, 3, 2, 1, 1],
   [4, 1, 1, 3, 1, 3, 4, 3, 2, 1],
   [4, 3, 1, 4, 4, 4, 1, 1, 2, 4],
   [2, 4, 4, 4, 3, 4, 2, 2, 2, 4],
   [2, 2, 4, 4, 3, 3, 1, 3, 4, 4]])

prob = [0.25, 0.5, 0.75] is the default value for the quantile settings, you can change it or leave it away.

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Unfortunately, this will not work. mquantiles only work with data that is not binned. –  imsc Aug 28 '12 at 13:21

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