Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Every time I read https://developers.facebook.com/roadmap/offline-access-removal/, I'm left more confused than the time before. I'm looking for some clarification on some items under scenarios 3 and 4 (server-side apps and client-side apps)

For server-side apps, it states "If the call is made while there is still a valid 60-day access_token for that user, the returned access_token from this second call may be the same or may have changed, but in either case the expiration time will be a fresh 60 days."

  • What is "the call" that is referred to here?
  • Is it the same exchange of an authorization code for the access token that takes place during the initial OAuth flow?
  • Or is it the endpoint call described under the client-side section to freshen the token to 60 days?
  • If it's the former, then where does the authorization code come from when trying to renew the token?
  • Is it the same authorization code from the original callback or do I have to go through the authorization flow again?

In short, can a server-side app keep freshening the life of a 60-day token and, if so then how?

Regarding client-side use, the document indicates that the client must make that endpoint call passing in (among other things) the application's client ID and client secret.

  • My interpretation of "client-side" may be wrong, but I'm thinking in terms of a JavaScript-based client running in a web-browser.
  • If that's what Facebook has in mind here, then should the JavaScript code really ever know about the client secret? (It won't be much of a secret if it's sent to the client.)

Even then, it indicates that 60-day tokens cannot have their life extended and that a new 2-hour token must first be acquired and used to get a 60-day token. This is under the client-side portion of the document, but does this rule apply to server-side 60-day tokens, too? If not, then I ask again: How do I freshen the life of a 60-day token on the server-side?

Finally, the question that has been burning in my mind for some time: Why has Facebook adopted this strategy and not adopted the refresh token as defined in the OAuth 2 specification (a specification that Facebook is helping define)???

EDIT: Further thoughts/questions after re-reading the document again:

At the beginning it says "a long-lived expiration time that can be renewed each time the user revists your app". My initial assumption is that the way to renew it would be to make a call to the endpoint later in the document. But, aside from the fact that the endpoint is described under the "client-side" heading, it also states "Please note, the endpoint can only be used to extend the short-lived user access_tokens. If you pass an access_token that had a long-lieved expiration time, the endpoint will simply pass that same access_token back to you without altering or extending the expiration time." (The typo on "long-lieved" is from FB's own documentation.)

Okay, so if that endpoint cannot be used to renew the expiration time (and my own attempts to renew a long-lived token with that endpoint prove this out), then how can I renew the expiration time on a long-lived token each time they visit my app?

Is there no one who understands how this is supposed to work?

share|improve this question
    
I do have the same doubts you have. I was so glad I found this question but all my happiness fall apart when I found no one has answered this yet. I don't know if it's me or Facebook is really bad writing documentation. –  HyperD Apr 30 '12 at 13:53

1 Answer 1

After reading Facebook's doc (like for the 5th time) and with the help of this question/answer this are my conclusions.

What is "the call" that is referred to here?

It referres to the OAuth call to get an access token.

Is it the same exchange of an authorization code for the access token that takes place during the initial OAuth flow?

Yes, I believe it's that flow.

Or is it the endpoint call described under the client-side section to freshen the token to 60 days?

No, that endpoint is only valid for short-lived access tokens.

Is it the same authorization code from the original callback or do I have to go through the authorization flow again?

You've to go through the authorization flow again.

how can I renew the expiration time on a long-lived token each time they visit my app?

Long-lived access tokens cannot be renewed using the client side endpoint. The user will have to reauthorize the app to get a new one. According to Facebook documentation:

If the call (OAuth authorization call) is made while there is still a valid long-lived user access_token for that user, the returned user access_token from this second call may be the same or may have changed, but in either case the expiration time will be set to a long expiration time.

Once the application is reauthorized you'll get a new expiration time. Facebook may return a new long-lived access token, so you should grab it and replace that information for the one you already had.

Conclusion: Seems there's no way to renew a long-lived access token without user intervention. To get a new expiration time/access token they'll have to reauthorize your app. My humble advice is that should suggest the user to reauthorize it, a few days before the expiration date. Also, this Facebook how-to can came in handy for checking expired access tokens.

share|improve this answer
    
Craig, has this answer been any good?. –  HyperD Jun 8 '12 at 1:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.