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I don't know if this is LINQPad-related or I'm doing something wrong, but this code doesn't do what I want it to do, specifically the ForEach(...)

My goal is to replace the " " with an empty string; is there a better way to do this?

var lastNames = "SMITH, JOHNSON, WILLIAMS, JONES, BROWN";

var listLastNames = lastNames.Split(',');
var list = listLastNames.ToList(); //so I can use .ForEach
list.ForEach(i=>i.Replace(" ",String.Empty));

list.Dump(); //show it on output
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4  
In addition to the fact that you are discarding the result, I note that you probably want Trim, not Replace. –  Eric Lippert Apr 24 '12 at 21:36
    
list.ForEach(i=>i.Trim()); didn't work here, so I thought Replace might... but it didn't work as well... –  Jan Carlo Viray Apr 24 '12 at 21:41
2  
Trim() would suffice, except you'll have the same issue because you're not retrieving the results –  PinnyM Apr 24 '12 at 21:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted

As others have pointed out, strings are immutable. Calling Replace simply returns a new string; it does not mutate the existing string in place. Here are three ways to do what you want:

Do the transformation on the sequence, and convert it to a list at the end:

string s = "SMITH, JOHNSON, WILLIAMS, JONES, BROWN";  
List<string> lastNames = s.Split(',').Select(x=>x.Trim()).ToList();

Or, the same thing in query syntax:

string s = "SMITH, JOHNSON, WILLIAMS, JONES, BROWN"; 
var query = from lastName in s.Split(',')
            select lastName.Trim();
List<string> lastNames = query.ToList();

Or, make an array and mutate the array in place:

string s = "SMITH, JOHNSON, WILLIAMS, JONES, BROWN";  
string[] lastNames = s.Split(',');
for (int i = 0; i < lastNames.Length; ++i)
    lastNames[i] = lastNames[i].Trim();
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Aren't the elements in the string array Immutable (as they are internally strings) ? Meaning , is lastNames[i] immutable ? –  Dhananjay Apr 25 '12 at 3:41
3  
@Dhananjay: A string is immutable. An array is a collection of variables, which are by definition mutable; that's why they're called variables. –  Eric Lippert Apr 25 '12 at 6:15
1  
A compiler warning when somebody ignores the return value of a [Pure] function would be nice. Such a warning wouldn't have many false positives, and the annotations were already created by the code-contracts team. Coding it is pretty easy too(I managed it in an afternoon while learning roslyn), and since this mistake is quite common, the gain is there too. –  CodesInChaos Apr 25 '12 at 16:45
    
@CodeInChaos ReSharper recently added such a warning, which uncovered a couple of bugs in one of the applications I maintain. We never caught the bugs before because the buggy code handles conditions that have not yet arisen in the data we process. –  phoog Apr 26 '12 at 22:25

Replace returns a new value, but doesn't affect the original String that you call it on. To do what you need, you'd have to build a new collection with the results from Replace - you can do this easily with Select:

var replaced = list.Select(i=>i.Replace(" ",String.Empty));

Another benefit, you won't need to cast to a List<T> to do this.

And as others have pointed out, you can use Trim() as a cleaner solution than Replace():

var collection = lastNames.Split(',').Select(i => i.Trim());
share|improve this answer
    
well, this one did its thing! thanks for that! –  Jan Carlo Viray Apr 24 '12 at 21:42

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