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I’m learning Objective-C and I’m confused on what the difference is between an instance of a class and an object –- are they the same ?

Heres an example:

 NSString *name = [[NSString alloc]initWithString:@"Harry"]; 

*name is a pointer to the NSString class. @"Harry" is the value of the string. So is name an Object from the NSString class or is name called an instance of a class?

Another example from a Class I made:

  Rectangle *rect = [[Rectangle alloc]init];  

So *rect is a pointer. Is rect an Object or is it an instance of a class ?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In ObjectiveC, an instance of a class is always an object. And an object is always an instance of a class. An "object" is an instance of a class, a class which somewhere down the chain eventually inherits from NSObject. When you declare a class with no superclass, NSObject is the implicit superclass.

NSString *name = [[NSString alloc]initWithString:@"Harry"]; 

name is a pointer to an object, which more specifically is an instance of NSString that has a value of "Harry".

All NSString's are objects, but not all objects are NSString's.

Rectangle *rect = [[Rectangle alloc]init];

Same here. rect is a pointer to an object, which is an instance of Rectangle.

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Thanks for all your answers but I'm still a little bit confused. So are we saying *rect is just a pointer. rect is the Object (which is an instance from the Rectangle class). Memory is allocated to rect.

@pete yes you have it correct.

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A pointer is not an object. It is simply an address in memory where the object is allocated (stored). Hence, it points to the object. Pointers are in fact a C-language construct, which Objective-C inherits (pardon the pun). Julius is correct that you will hear them interchangeably used, technically "rect" is the instance/object and "*" conveys pointer-to.

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Thanks for all your answers but I'm still a little bit confused. So are we saying *rect is just a pointer. rect is the Object (which is an instance from the Rectangle class). Memory is allocated to rect. –  pete Apr 24 '12 at 22:56
    
It's a compound type. The local variable rect is of type *Rectangle, that is a pointer to where in memory that instance data is stored. That data in memory has no name, its just data. The only way to get it is by having a pointer to it (in other language this may be called having a "reference" to an object). Otherwise your data is just bits floating around in a RAM chip. –  Alex Wayne Apr 24 '12 at 23:23

So *rect is a pointer. Is rect an Object or is it an instance of a class ?

It is both. An instance of a class is also an object, just as the McIntosh that I just finished eating is an instance of the "class" Apple, and is also a fruit.

"Object" is a generic term for a programming structure that keeps some state (its instance variables) and (generally) can perform actions that affect that state (its methods). An instance of a class is a specific object.

In Objective-C, objects are accessed via pointers; that's just the mechanism by which you interact with them. Strictly speaking, the object itself and the pointer to the object are distinct: rect is a pointer to an object, an instance of class Rectangle, but in everyday language, you might see people talking about them in the same way: rect is a Rectangle.

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This is a bad analogy. You are conflating oop and inheritance with programming jargon / terminology –  ControlAltDel Apr 24 '12 at 22:31
    
@user1: Please elaborate. "OOP", "inheritance", "object", and "instance" are programming terminology. –  Josh Caswell Apr 24 '12 at 22:32
    
you made the comment that your apple is also a fruit. This is an example of OOP. Then you say it both an instance and an object, which is really just an explanation that in this situation both of these terms can be used. So the first is OOP, the second is about programming jargon –  ControlAltDel Apr 24 '12 at 22:37
    
ps I voted up on you anyway :) –  ControlAltDel Apr 24 '12 at 22:37

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