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I am reading sample code GLVideoFrame from WWDC2010. In this sample, it has code like below:

static const GLfloat squareVertices[] = {
    -0.5f,  -0.33f,
     0.5f,  -0.33f,
    -0.5f,   0.33f,
     0.5f,   0.33f,
};
...
glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION);
glLoadIdentity();
glMatrixMode(GL_MODELVIEW);
glLoadIdentity();
glTranslatef(0.0f, (GLfloat)(sinf(transY)/2.0f), 0.0f);
transY += 0.075f;

...
glVertexPointer(2, GL_FLOAT, 0, squareVertices);

Notice that this code does not call any function like glFrustum or glOrtho for openGL projection setting.

By only calling gLoadIdentity(), what will be the "default" view volume?

it wil be a perspective project or orthographic projection?

edited: to be more specific, is the view volume a cube that "ranging from -1 to 1 in all three axes" ?

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can someone give me a reason why this question is voted -1? too stupid question? too simple? I actually googled around, and read the "red book" for few days and did not find any clue. I really appreciate someone can point to me where I should find the answer? –  Gu. Apr 25 '12 at 1:18
    
Downvote is on conscience of that man :) gLoadIdentity() setups identity matrix for projection mode, same thing with modelview matrix. glFrustum and glOrtho setup these matrices from different input params. You may look at your matrices in runtime when capture OpenGL frame via XCode (it works on iPad 2/New and iPhone 4S devices). –  brigadir Apr 25 '12 at 6:14
    
"You may look at your matrices in runtime when capture OpenGL frame via XCode", this does not directly relate to my question, but sounds interesting. Can you give me a link about How? –  Gu. Apr 25 '12 at 13:05
    
developer.apple.com/library/ios/#documentation/DeveloperTools/… (OpenGL ES Frame Capture section) –  brigadir Apr 25 '12 at 13:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

OpenGL assumes that after the ModelView and Projection transform, all visible elements are in clip space (or NDC space); it uses the cube [-1;+1]^3. The matrices contents is entirely your responsibility. Since you load the identity matrix, there is no Projection at all.

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That is the exact the explanation I am looking for. Thanks! –  Gu. Apr 25 '12 at 13:01

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