Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is it possible to assign a value to a final variable anywhere else in the program? Or is it mandatory that they be assigned a value upon creation?

class TestClass() {
//this won't compile but is it possible to assign str a value anywhere else in the program?
public static final String str;
}
share|improve this question
    
If you don't init the value at the definition line, where would you possibly assign it? –  shengy Apr 25 '12 at 1:46

3 Answers 3

You need to assign a value when it's declared - in the constructor if it's not static, in the static initializer block if it is. Once you set the value, it can't be modified.

Do it like this:

public class FinalTest {
    private static final String CONSTANT;

    private final String value;

    static {
        CONSTANT = "Hello";
    }

    public static void main(String [] args) {
        FinalTest ft = ((args.length > 0) ? new FinalTest(args[0]) : new FinalTest(CONSTANT));
        System.out.println(ft);
    }

    public FinalTest(String value) {
        this.value = value;
    }

    public String toString() { return this.value; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
can you give an example of how else you can initialize it? i.e. you mention in the constructor...when i do that it still doesn't compile though. –  dido Apr 25 '12 at 1:50
2  
Slight correction: final fields aren't initialized to null. Otherwise you'd never be able to put another value in them. A final field must be explicitly initialized exactly once. Anything else is a compilation failure. –  Ryan Stewart Apr 25 '12 at 2:00
    
The code that I wrote compiles and runs. I agree - they have to be initialized. I'll amend my answer. –  duffymo Apr 25 '12 at 2:01

In the code you posted, the field is static so it could be given a value from within a static initialization block:

static {
    str = "my string";
}

For non-static fields, they can either be initialized in the constructor, or in an instance initializer block:

class TestClass {
    private final String str;

    {
        str = "my string";
    }

    TestClass() {

    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
what if it wasn't static? can you still do the same within a non-static initialization block? –  dido Apr 25 '12 at 1:51
    
Edited to demonstrate an instance initialization block. However, I'd recommend only using initialization blocks if necessary as they can be a bit confusing. IMO static final fields should almost always be given a value where they are declared, and final instance fields should be given a value where declared or in the constructor. –  Paul Blessing Apr 25 '12 at 1:58

Local variables

A final variable needs to be assigned a value exactly once before it is accessed. This means that if it's never assigned a value and never accessed, the compiler won't complain.

void foo() {
    final int a; // Never assigned, but never accessed either, so no problem
    final int b = 7;

    System.out.println("b is " + b);

    // System.out.println("a is " + a);
    // Uncommenting the above line would cause a compile error
}

Static fields

A similar logic applies to final static fields, except it's assumed that they will be accessed at some point, so they must be initialized either on the definition line or in a static initializer block.

Here's what the Java tutorial has to say about static initialization blocks:

This works well when the initialization value is available and the initialization can be put on one line. However, this form of initialization has limitations because of its simplicity. If initialization requires some logic (for example, error handling or a for loop to fill a complex array), simple assignment is inadequate. Instance variables can be initialized in constructors, where error handling or other logic can be used. To provide the same capability for class variables, the Java programming language includes static initialization blocks.

Note: It is not necessary to declare fields at the beginning of the class definition, although this is the most common practice. It is only necessary that they be declared and initialized before they are used.

Instance fields

While we're at it, a final instance (non-static) field must be assigned a value exactly once by the time the instance initialization is complete. This means there are three places where you can initialize one (but you must pick one):

1. Definition line:

// For when you know the answer
class Foo {
    final int theAnswer = 42;
}

2. Constructor:

// For when you need to have the answer passed in
class Foo {
    final int theAnswer;

    Foo(int answer) {
        theAnswer = answer;
    }
}

// Or for when you need to do some computation
class Bar {
    static final int ANSWER_COUNT = 10;
    final int[] answers;

    Foo() {
        answers = new int[ANSWER_COUNT];
        for (int i = 0; i < ANSWER_COUNT; i++) {
            answers[i] = i;
        }
    }

3. Initializer block:

// For when you need to do some computation and have many constructors
class Bar {
    static final int ANSWER_COUNT = 10;
    final int[] answers;

    {
        answers = new int[ANSWER_COUNT];
        for (int i = 0; i < ANSWER_COUNT; i++) {
            answers[i] = i;
        }
    }

    // I have many constructors and don't want to copy-paste 
    // the initialization logic above to all of them
    Bar() { ... }
    Bar(int i) { ... }
    Bar(String blah) { ... }
}

From the same page in the tutorial, regarding initializer blocks:

The Java compiler copies initializer blocks into every constructor. Therefore, this approach can be used to share a block of code between multiple constructors.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.