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Can I use an out parameter with a recursive method? If it's possible, how can I do it with the following code?

private void PrepareDir(out List<_File> listFiles,string root,string dirPath) {
    DirectoryInfo dirRoot = new DirectoryInfo(dirPath);
    FileInfo [] Files = dirRoot.GetFiles();
    dirPath = dirPath.Substring(root.Length);

    foreach (FileInfo file in Files) {
        _File _file = new _File();
        _file.Name = dirPath + "\\" + file.Name;
        _file.Path = file.FullName;
        _file.Size = file.Length;
        listFiles.Add(_file);
    }

    foreach (DirectoryInfo dir in dirRoot.GetDirectories()) {
        PrepareDir(out listFiles, root, dir.FullName);
    }
}

private void btnButton1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e) {
    List<_File> Files = new List<_File>();
    PrepareDir(out Files,currAddress, currAddress);
}
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6  
That should not be an out parameter. –  SLaks Apr 25 '12 at 3:08
1  
Consider that your listFiles parameter is passed by reference (as it is a reference type), you aren't actually reassigning the identifer; ergo: out is not necessary and the code could work without it in your case. –  payo Apr 25 '12 at 3:09
    
@SLaks so it's not possible to use out with a recursive method? –  Murhaf Sousli Apr 25 '12 at 3:10
    
@MurHafSoz it is possible, but the way you are using it is not necessary, it'll work without it (you'd need to assign the identifier as per the rules of out) –  payo Apr 25 '12 at 3:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I decided to rewrite my answer to be more direct about why using out is not necessary here. I wrote this to be rather lengthy, because I think the root of your question is more in not understanding the differences between passing by value, passing by reference, and the common confusion between a reference type being passed by reference. Also note that this isn't explicit to only recursion.

In C#, reference types are passed by value by default. A lot of people can confuse a reference type with passing by reference, but there is an important difference. To make myself more clear, I will refer to a reference type as is, and passing by reference as using the ref or out keywords.

Passing a reference type by value, because it is a reference to some storage location in memory, allows you to make and persist changes. Take this example.

public class MyRefType
{
    public int Value { get; set; }
}

public void Foo() {
    MyRefType type = new MyRefType();
    AddOne(type);
}

public void AddOne(MyRefType type) {
    type.Value++;
}

What will happen here, is that the class type will now have a value of one. This is the nature of a reference type. If type were a struct, it would still have a value of 0 inside the Foo method, because a copy was made instead of holding a reference to the object.

Now that I hope you understand the symantics of passing a reference type by value, let's actually talk about passing a reference type by reference. This is done using the out and ref keywords. Make it a point to note immediately that in the CLR, out technically does not exist, only ref does. out is actually represented in metadata as ref with a special attribute applied to it, and they ought to be treated the same.

Now let's say we wanted to re-assign our reference type in the AddOne method before doing the addition.

public class MyRefType
{
    public int Value { get; set; }
}

public void Foo() {
    MyRefType type = new MyRefType();
    AddOne(type);
}

public void AddOne(MyRefType type) {
    type = new MyReferenceType();
    type.Value++;
}

Because we are still passing our reference type by value, the value of type in the method Foo will still be 0. All we did was initialize another storage location in memory, instead of reassigning the original storage location). But we want to actually pass our reference type by reference, so we should really do:

public class MyRefType
{
    public int Value { get; set; }
}

public void Foo() {
    MyRefType type = new MyRefType();
    AddOne(ref type);
}

public void AddOne(ref MyRefType type) {
    type = new MyReferenceType();
    type.Value++;
}

Now the value of type in the Foo method will be 1. This is because we reused the same storage location that the reference pointed to, instead of creating a new location in memory.

So how does all this apply to out? Remember that out is the same as ref with different usage symantics. The difference is that with ref you may leave the method without the reference being initialized, whereas with out, you must explicitly initialize it before the method returns.

So in your case of using out here, it is completely not necessary because you already have existing reference symantics working for you. I hope this clears up a bit.

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"This causes side effects that the caller of your API might not expect", except that in C# not out is required on the caller. So I disagree. –  payo Apr 25 '12 at 3:29
    
I had a typo (and now >5 minutes have passed and I can't fix it :) -- "C# out is required". You counter that not everyone understands what out does, I would disagree still...if it weren't for the very question in which we're discussing this HAHA :) I agree to avoid out in general, but 'at all costs' puts too much weight against using it imo. I like your post otherwise. –  payo Apr 25 '12 at 3:46

You are misusing the keyword out in your code example. Your List<_File> is passed as a reference type, and any changes made to that list will affect the caller's list. You only need to pass an out parameter when you want to reassign the caller's identifier.

Consider:

public bool Foo()
{
  List<int> list = new List<int>();
  list.Add(1);
  Bar(out list);
  return list.Contains(1);
}

public void Bar(out List<int> list)
{
  list = new List<int>();
  list.Add(2);
}

Foo would return false.

If, on the other hand, Bar was like this:

public void Bar(List<int> list)
{
  list = new List<int>();
  list.Add(2);
}

Then Foo would return true. See out for more details.

Your code would work as is without the use of out. And, in fact, would not compile - and to make it compile would increase unnecessary complexity to what you are trying to do. Don't use out in your case.

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