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I have the following program which tries to tokenize a string (based on space) and write it into a char ** array.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#define len 180

void tokenize(char *str, char **tokens)
{
    int l = 0, index = 0;
    int i = 0;
    int str_i;
    int tok_i;

    while(*str) {
        if (*str == ' ') {
            tokens[i] = malloc(sizeof(char) * l+1);
            if (tokens[i] == NULL) return;

            tok_i = 0;           
            for (str_i=index-len ; str_i<index ; str_i++) {
                tokens[i][tok_i] = str[str_i];
                tok_i++;
            }

            tokens[i][tok_i] = '\0';
            tokens[i++] = NULL;
            l = 0;
            index++;
        }
        str++;
        l++;
        index++;
    }       

    return;         
}

int main()
{
    char str[len] = "this is a test string";
    char **tokens = malloc(100 * sizeof(char *));

    if (str == NULL || tokens == NULL)
        return 1;

    printf("input string: %s\n", str);
    tokenize(str, tokens);

    return 0;
}

The above program compiled fine, but when executing, I got the following assertion in malloc.c

$ gcc -ggdb -Wall prog.c 
$ ./a.out 
input string: this is a test string
a.out: malloc.c:2453: sYSMALLOc: Assertion `(old_top == (((mbinptr) (((char *) &((av)->bins[((1) - 1) * 2])) - __builtin_offsetof (struct malloc_chunk, fd)))) && old_size == 0) || ((unsigned long) (old_size) >= (unsigned long)((((__builtin_offsetof (struct malloc_chunk, fd_nextsize))+((2 * (sizeof(size_t))) - 1)) & ~((2 * (sizeof(size_t))) - 1))) && ((old_top)->size & 0x1) && ((unsigned long)old_end & pagemask) == 0)' failed.
Aborted (core dumped)
$ 

And the stack trace shows the following:

(gdb) bt
#0  0x0000003b28036285 in raise () from /lib64/libc.so.6
#1  0x0000003b28037b9b in abort () from /lib64/libc.so.6
#2  0x0000003b2807d37d in __malloc_assert () from /lib64/libc.so.6
#3  0x0000003b28080c37 in _int_malloc () from /lib64/libc.so.6
#4  0x0000003b28082595 in malloc () from /lib64/libc.so.6
#5  0x000000000040055f in tokenize (str=0x7fffffffe017 " a test string", tokens=0x601010) at prog.c:15
#6  0x00000000004006de in main () at prog.c:46
(gdb) 

How do I debug this? Any idea would be highly appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
Why not just use strtok?? –  Greg Brown Apr 25 '12 at 3:52
    
my C is too rusty to give you any useful advice without sitting here and staring at it for 20 minutes, but I can tell you immediately that you're forgetting to free your tokens pointer, so, this program leaks memory (albeit not very much), and since presumably this is a homework assignment (else you really should just use strtok), that will cost you points. :) –  Genia S. Apr 25 '12 at 3:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In your for loop

for (str_i=index-len ; str_i<index ; str_i++)

str_i is a negative number.

share|improve this answer
for (str_i=index-len ; str_i<index ; str_i++) {
        tokens[i][tok_i] = str[str_i];
        tok_i++;
}

tokens[i][tok_i] = '\0';

At least one of those tokens[i][tok_i] is outside the allocated memory so you end up clobbering malloc's internal information. After that, hilarity ensues.

The str_i initialization is also interesting, given it will be -180 for the first iteration.

share|improve this answer

Yes, with suggestions from @cnicutar and @spicavigo, I changed the code as follows and it works fine.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#define str_len 180

void tokenize(char *str, char **tokens)
{
    int length = 0, index = 0;
    int i = 0;
    int str_i;
    int tok_i;

    while(str[length]) {
        if (str[length] == ' ') {
            /* this charecter is a space, so skip it! */
            length++;
            index++;

            tokens[i] = malloc(sizeof(char) * (index+1));

            tok_i = 0;           
            for (str_i=length-index ; str_i<length; str_i++) {
                tokens[i][tok_i] = str[str_i];
                tok_i++;
            }

            tokens[i][tok_i] = '\0';
            i++;
            index = 0;
        }
        length++;
        index++;
    }       

    /* copy the last word in the string */
    tokens[i] = malloc(sizeof(char) * index);
    tok_i = 0;           
    for (str_i=length-index ; str_i<length; str_i++) {
        tokens[i][tok_i] = str[str_i];
        tok_i++;
    }
    tokens[i][tok_i] = '\0';
    tokens[i++] = NULL;

    return;         
}

int main()
{
    char *str = malloc(str_len * sizeof(char));
    char **tokens = malloc(100 * sizeof(char *));
    int i = 0;

    if (str == NULL || tokens == NULL)
        return 1;

    gets(str);
    printf("input string: %s\n", str);
    tokenize(str, tokens);

    while(tokens[i] != NULL) {
        printf("%d - %s \n", i, tokens[i]);
        i++;
    }

    while(tokens[i])
        free(tokens[i]);
    free(tokens);
    free(str);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
It might work but tokens[i] = malloc(sizeof(char) * index); does not allocate enough memory, the line tokens[i][tok_i] = '\0'; will always be a buffer overrun. Example, when index is 1 and length is 1, it will malloc 1 byte, copy one byte, and then write '\0' into tokens[i][1] –  weston Apr 25 '12 at 8:22
    
Also index and length are missleading names, makes it tricky to follow. index is a count of tokens that are not spaces, and length is the index into the source array. –  weston Apr 25 '12 at 8:25
    
@weston Good point on malloc. I've corrected the same. –  Sangeeth Saravanaraj Apr 25 '12 at 8:26

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