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I have code similar to following:

class OuterClass
{
   private final AtomicInteger count = new AtomicInteger(0);

   private class InnerClass extends TimerTask
   {
       public void run()
       {
            ......
            ......
            incremenetCount();
       }
   }

   public void doSomething()
   {
        .......
        .......
        incremenetCount();
   }

   private void incrementCount()
   {
      count.incrementAndGet();
   }
}

Is calling incrementCount from inner class the same as calling it from any other function in outer class as the synchronization is actually around the variable count?

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You may be misunderstanding something about this code. There's no synchronization here. –  Ryan Stewart Apr 25 '12 at 4:53
    
Well, I did not put up the decrement part of the code as weel. There are 2 possibilities InnerClass extends TimerTask and it is possible there might be multiple executions of InnerClass exist at the same time. Also what if doSomething was called by an external class at the same instant InnerClass is calling incrementAndCount. –  Prasanna Apr 25 '12 at 5:02
    
My point is that you seem to either think that some code here is synchronized or else not know what "synchronization" means in Java. In either case, you should read up on Java concurrency before you try to write any serious multi-threaded code. –  Ryan Stewart Apr 25 '12 at 5:11
    
All I said here was I want to make sure the variable count is modified atomically and I gave you scenarios as when atomic modification is essential. Maybe you should try to explain what is you are trying to point out and reserve judgements for later. –  Prasanna Apr 25 '12 at 5:32
    
I'm not sure how I can be any clearer. You used the word "synchronization" to describe code which isn't synchronized. I'm just trying to suggest you have a clear understanding of a very difficult subject before diving headlong into it. –  Ryan Stewart Apr 25 '12 at 5:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Is calling incrementAndCount from inner class the same as calling it from any other function in outer class [...]

Yes, calling incrementCount() from the inner class is the same as calling incrementCount() from the outer count.

All non-static inner classes have an implicit reference to the object of the enclosing class, and it is through this reference the incrementCount() will be called.

(Story would have been different if your inner class was static though.)

as the synchronization is actually around the variable count?

Doesn't matter. The same method, is called on the same object, regardless if you do the call from the inner or from the outer class.

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(If the inner class was static, the code would not compile, so "the story" is moot.) –  Stephen C Apr 25 '12 at 5:23

The short answer is that it is safe.

To understand why, lets look at this:

class SomeClass {
    private final AtomicInteger count = new AtomicInteger(0);
    ...
    private void incrementCount() {
        count.incrementAndGet();
    }
}

There are two questions that need to be considered to determine whether this is thread-safe.

  1. Is the fetch of count properly synchronized? Answer yes - because count is declared as final and there is rule that says that a final field can be read without synchronization once the constructor has completed.

  2. Is the incrementAndGet() method thread-safe? Answer yes - the specification of the AtomicInteger class says so.

Now let us look at the case with the inner class. The instance of inner class has a hidden final reference to the instance of the outer class. So ...

    public void run() {
        incrementCount();
    }

is equivalent to this ...

    private final OuterClass $outer;  // initialized by the constructor.
    ...
    public void run() {
        $outer.incrementCount();
    }

By the reasoning of point 1. above, the incrementCount() call itself is thread-safe. And the fetch of $outer is thread-safe too, because it is implicitly a final field.

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That was a thorough explanation. Thanks. –  Prasanna Apr 25 '12 at 6:03

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