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i got a view controller display a table view, see below:

//.h file
@interface CoreDataViewController : UIViewController<UITableViewDataSource, UITableViewDelegate>
    //NSArray property
    @property (retain, nonatomic) NSArray *arr;
@end

//.m file
- (void)viewDidLoad {
    //fetch data from core data, pass to arr property
    //context is a instance of NSManagedObjectContext
    arr = [context executeFetchRequest:request error:nil];
}

- (NSInteger)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView numberOfRowsInSection:(NSInteger)section {   
    if (arr == nil) {
        return 0;
    }
    return [arr count]; //program stop here, nothing showed up in output console
}

xcode Profile(Instrument) tells me there is a zombie object at return [arr count]; i am confused what's happened in background maybe the property arr be released by iOS, but the property do has a retain keyword in .h file.

i find a solution could fix this issue if NSArray replace with NSMutableArray like this:

@interface CoreDataViewController : UIViewController<UITableViewDataSource, UITableViewDelegate>
    //change to NSMutableArray
    @property (retain, nonatomic) NSMutableArray *arr;
@end

- (void)viewDidLoad {
    //convert NSArray to NSMutableArray
    arr = [[context executeFetchRequest:request error:nil] mutableCopy];
}

is there a retain or autorelease in mutableCopy method?

share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Per the Basic Memory Management Rules, yes, mutableCopy increases the retain count. Bottom line, methods that have a name beginning with alloc, new, copy, or mutableCopy all return an object with a +1 retain count (i.e., it will be retained for you, therefore you're taking ownership and, in a non-ARC project, you're responsible for manually releasing it). The executeFetchRequest method doesn't, so it (can) return a zero retain count and you can't rely on it being around unless you take ownership of it, i.e. you effectively +1 the retain count by doing some retain of your own.

Now, clearly, you were assuming that because you defined your property as a retain property, it would be retained for you. But you have to use the system generated setter to do that, but your initial code sample does not do that. Rather, you're accessing the ivar directly yourself, bypassing the setter. If you want to take ownership, increasing the retain count as implied by your property, you should invoke the default setter:

[self setArr:[context executeFetchRequest:request error:nil]];

or use the dot notation equivalent:

self.arr = [context executeFetchRequest:request error:nil];

But when you use the ivar arr, by itself (without the dot or self setArr syntax), it's bypassing the setter method. This is not good practice, because you're not doing the necessary retain. In this example (because you know that arr doesn't already have a value), you could theoretically do:

arr = [[context executeFetchRequest:request error:nil] retain];

But if arr might have already had a pointer to another array, you'd really want:

[release arr];
arr = [[context executeFetchRequest:request error:nil] retain];

It's just safe to use the setter, and avoid some of this silliness. Take a look at Declared Properties, understand how the use of retain translates to what setter code, and I think this might make more sense.

Update:

By the way, as the others point out, while the above code solves the problem of your array not being retained, but once you successfully do the retain, you have to remember to release it in your dealloc.

share|improve this answer
    
very nice and detailed comments @Robert Ryan. i am used to thinking with C# syntax so ignore difference between ivar and property. Thank you for the patience to answer, now I know. – rock Apr 25 '12 at 7:54
    
Sadly, the Objective C distinction between ivars and properties is unnecessarily obtuse. More broadly, memory handling is a fundamental weakness of this language. Programmers really shouldn't have to worry about this sort of thing. ARC gets the language closer to something more appropriate (and if you haven't looked at it, you really should), but the language still feels a little anachronistic. – Rob Apr 25 '12 at 13:17

you need to release a variable yourself, if you are using mutableCopy. it increases retain count by 1, but won't decrease that. Might be you can use like -

arr = [[[context executeFetchRequest:request error:nil] mutableCopy] autorelease];
share|improve this answer
    
No offense, but this syntax will suffer the precise problem that I think @rock is trying to solve, that the variable is getting released on him before his tableView:numberOfRowsInSection is being invoked. He really wants to retain the variable (either by explicitly retaining what he sets his ivar to, or to use the property's setter method). But to your good point, he can't forget to release this variable he retained in his dealloc or viewDidUnload. – Rob Apr 25 '12 at 6:36
    
well, now i do remember Apple's guide mentions that object return from copy method have to explicitly release, thanks both of you – rock Apr 25 '12 at 7:56
    
@rock - if your problem is fixed, then you can accept the appropriate answer and can close this question. – rishi Apr 25 '12 at 8:09

Yes, the property arr do has a retain keyword in .h file, but you used the ivar directly, you didn't use the setter method to set the value of arr. So it won't increase the retain count of arr, You should change your code to this:

//.m file
- (void)viewDidLoad {
  //fetch data from core data, pass to arr property
  //context is a instance of NSManagedObjectContext
  self.arr = [context executeFetchRequest:request error:nil];
}

and release arr in dealloc method

- (void)dealloc
{
  [arr release];
  [super dealloc];
}

no need to change NSArray to NSMutableArray

share|improve this answer
    
thanks @Tranz, i got it. you guys help me a lot to understand memory management, self keyword and getter setter. i won't make such mistake ever – rock Apr 25 '12 at 7:49

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