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A very often executed piece of code has the following calculation :

long *lp
char *ep, *cp
...
tlen = (ep - cp) / sizeof (*lp);

Would changing this to:

long *lp
char *ep, *cp
...
tlen = (ep - cp) / sizeof (long);

result in any more efficiency (since the sizeof of calculated at compile time) or would a modern compiler handle this at compile time already. what does gcc do ?

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3  
sizeof is always (aside from variable length arrays, which are problematic in other ways) a compile time constant. If you give it an expression, it figures at compile time the size of that expression's type. –  geekosaur Apr 25 '12 at 5:32
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4 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The sizeof operator is always a compile time evaluated construct 0, so there is no difference.

The fragment ...

 tlen = (ep - cp) / sizeof (*lp);

will therefore be transformed into something not unlike ...

 tlen = (ep - cp) / 4;

(assuming that sizeof(long)==4 1.), with optimizations applied the next transformation is probably ...

 tlen = (ep - cp) >> 2;

More optimizations to come, of course; it's just a demonstration of a possible consequence of it being a compile time construct 0.

I would always prefer "sizeof(_var-name_)" over sizeof(_typename_), as its more generic and doesn't require manual adjustment when you change the type of the variable (except when you change from array to pointer).


0: Except for variable length arrays.

1: Size differs with platform

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sizeof() is always calculated at compile-time, so there's no difference.

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Not always, since C99 there have been VLAs whose size varies at runtime. –  Dietrich Epp Apr 25 '12 at 5:34
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You can dispense with the division altogether by writing

tlen = ((long*)ep - (long*)cp);

I'm not sure if the implementation of this would be more efficient though. My little experiment was inconclusive. Test!

Edit: And as mentioned in the comments, it works only if the pointers actually point to longs (or to memory locations fit to hold longs). But if they didn't in the original code, the original result wouldn't make sense either, so I presumed that they are.

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The casts invoke undefined behavior if ep and cp don't have suitable alignment for type long. –  R.. Apr 25 '12 at 5:54
    
@R.. You're right, I hadn't thought about that. But then, the OP's original formula is also severely compromised if the pointers are not aligned. –  Mr Lister Apr 25 '12 at 6:12
    
@MrLister No it isn't. It is quite possible that the code doesn't make sense, but the result is well-defined, as far as the C language is concerned. –  Lundin Apr 25 '12 at 6:22
    
Yes, but I was working under the assumption that the original code 1) did make sense, and 2) actually worked as intended. That could only work if the pointers` values were aligned. –  Mr Lister Apr 25 '12 at 6:37
    
The original code avoids lossy division as long as the difference is aligned, even if the two values are not individually aligned -- and even if the division is lossy, it doesn't invoke UB. –  R.. Apr 25 '12 at 16:47
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Would not result in performance difference but would result in behaviour differences depending on the platform. eg: on Win x64 sizeof(long) will be 4 but sizeof(*lp) is 8

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