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This is implemented as follows (jdk1.6.0_31):

private static class ReverseComparator<T>
implements Comparator<Comparable<Object>>, Serializable {

// use serialVersionUID from JDK 1.2.2 for interoperability
private static final long serialVersionUID = 7207038068494060240L;

    public int compare(Comparable<Object> c1, Comparable<Object> c2) {
        return c2.compareTo(c1);
    }

    private Object readResolve() { return reverseOrder(); }
}

Why can't it instead be implemented as follows:

private static class ReverseComparator<T extends Comparable<T>> 
implements Comparator<T>, Serializable {

// use serialVersionUID from JDK 1.2.2 for interoperability
private static final long serialVersionUID = 7207038068494060240L;

    public int compare(T c1, T c2){
        return c2.compareTo(c1);
    }
    ...
}

Is it just style, or is there some deeper reason?

EDIT: the source code shown is from Sun/Oracle jdk ((jdk1.6.0_31)).

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Where exactly is this code from? I'm not finding it in JDK, but there's a ton of other places. None so far even use generics. –  Marko Topolnik Apr 25 '12 at 7:40
    
I found it in jdk1.6.0_31, src.zip. –  shrini1000 Apr 25 '12 at 7:42
    
But can you tell me exactly where? Inside what class? –  Marko Topolnik Apr 25 '12 at 7:49
    
java.util.Collections –  Betlista Apr 25 '12 at 7:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I believe it is all related to the intention of making of ReverseComparator a singlenton object. Since the singlenton instance has to be defined in a static context there is no point in using any generic types.

static final ReverseComparator REVERSE_ORDER = new ReverseComparator();

This code, generates a raw type warning.

As such, the implementation of ReverseComparator, which is only used for this matter, could have been as you suggested or as it was implemented. Perhaps they chose the current implementation because it is easier to read, and because they thought that further generalization was not needed if it was only going to be privately used for this simple purpose.

Running the Java decompiler over your implementation and over the Oracle's implementation produces the same raw type byte codes.

 public int compare(java.lang.Comparable, java.lang.Comparable
 public int compare(java.lang.Object, java.lang.Object);

At the end, when the comparator is exposed through the public interface of the Collections class in the reverseOrder() method, it is impossible to avoid the casting and the unchecked warning. But we all are sure that this cannot fail, regardless of types involved.

Bottom line, IMHO I think the only reason why it was implemented as it was has to do with code clarity, or with the desire of not complicating the things more than necessary if, anyways, the unchecked warning could not be prevented. But hey, this wouldn't be the first time I am wrong ;-)

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I agree with you that further generalization is not needed because the class is privately used. In fact, I don't think any generalization of this is possible because there's no class in Java general enough which implements Comparable so that it could be used as a type argument in a parameterized type. So my feeling is, that <T> is more like a needless leftover from some previous code. –  shrini1000 Apr 26 '12 at 5:57

Just guessing, but it's stored in a static field

static final ReverseComparator REVERSE_ORDER
            = new ReverseComparator();

so your version would generate a 'raw types' warning.

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Well, I get that warning with Java's ReverseComparator too (since it declares 'T' in its definition) if I copy-paste that class in my class and instantiate it statically. –  shrini1000 Apr 25 '12 at 10:40
    
Hmm, in my source it's just private static class ReverseComparator (no T) –  artbristol Apr 25 '12 at 10:42
    
is it jdk1.6.0_31 or some other version? –  shrini1000 Apr 25 '12 at 11:14
    
Whatever one comes with Fedora - java-1.6.0-openjdk-1.6.0.0-65.1.11.1 - I guess it should be equivalent to the latest openJDK –  artbristol Apr 25 '12 at 11:29
    
Oh ok. The one I mentioned is Sun/Oracle jdk. Will modify the question to add this info. –  shrini1000 Apr 25 '12 at 11:34

I'm looking at Oracle 1.6.0_26, but I see the same code. As far as I can tell, those are functionally equivalent. You could also potentially write it like this:

private static class ReverseComparator<T> implements Comparator<Comparable<T>>, Serializable {

    // use serialVersionUID from JDK 1.2.2 for interoperability
    private static final long serialVersionUID = 7207038068494060240L;

    public int compare( Comparable<T> c1, Comparable<T> c2 ) {
        return c2.compareTo( (T) c1 );
    }

    private Object readResolve() {
        return reverseOrder();
    }
}

My only guess as to why they did it using Comparable<Object> is based on the fact that classes that implement Comparable (or Comparator) should obey the equals()contract, which does use Object. So semantically, this emphasizes that connection. Other than that, I can't think of a reason why.

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