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I read about namespaces here but found no answer to this..

For example:

// example1.cpp
#include "example1.h"
#include <set>

namespace MyNamespace
{
    using std::set;

    void f() {};
}



// example2.cpp
#include "example2.h"
#include <set>

using std::set;

namespace MyNamespace
{
    void f() {};
}

Both examples abowe are located inside some x? translation unit, and my project is withing namespace MyNamespace I have a fealing that second example is better but have no clue why because I can't see the imported name std::set in other translation units? So why would I bother whether will I call using std::set outside or inside Mynamespace?

Can you explain? Also, at wich point will std::set be imported into Mynamespace? how can you know that?

EDIT:

Assume the abowe to examples are cpp files of same project, well importing std::set inside or outside MyNamespace is equivalent because other cpp files (which are in the same namespace) won't see the name set anyway(even if you #include<set> and type using namespace MyNamespace, no effect. you'll have to type using std::set in each translatin unit if you want to use set I'm I correct, Why?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Remember than in C++, different source files will usually yield different Translation Units.

Informally, a Translation Unit is the result of including the files and you can observe it using -E (with gcc and clang) to dump the preprocessed output.

Now, translations units are independent from one another during the compilation phase. So whatever you do in one of them is of absolutely no effect in the others. This obviously holds for the using directives.

Of course, there are header files to help you share.

To be clear:

// foo.hpp
#include <set>

namespace Foo { using std::set; }

// foo.cpp
#include "foo.hpp"

namespace Foo {
    using std::swap;

    // both set and swap are accessible without further qualification
}

// bar.cpp
#include "foo.hpp"

namespace Foo {

    // set is accessible without further qualification, swap is not.

}

It should be noted that introducing names in the global namespace is better avoided. Whether new types, functions, typedef or via using directives. This way you will avoid conflicts :)

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Thank you very much! acctually the example and your last statement answered my question :) –  codekiddy Apr 25 '12 at 9:59
    
@codekiddy: I took the liberty to address the comment to Als' answer in addition to your question :) –  Matthieu M. Apr 25 '12 at 10:57
    
+1 For creating a nice code example which addresses OP's query in comments to my answer.Unfortunately, I was caught up in something(code review meetings :-]) and didn't notice the query comment till about a min ago,but this answers the query very conclusively. :) –  Alok Save Apr 25 '12 at 14:28
    
@Als: don't you hate it when your work-life eat away at your SO-life :D ? –  Matthieu M. Apr 25 '12 at 14:45

First imports the symbol name std::set only to Mynamespace while,
Second imports it to the current namespace in which the using declaration is written(this happens to be the global scope in your shown example).

You should be bothered about where you write the using directive because the symbol name is then imported only in that current namespace where it is written, and it will not be visible in other scopes.

I don't understand the part of the question, at which point std::set will be imported, this is point in relation to what exactly?

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In one cpp I type using std::set for example, but I can't see set in another translation unit which is in the same namespace. so it looks that there is no difference whether you type using::std inside or outside the namespace becuase you won't see that name from another cpp file... it's just like a static variable, I'm I correct? –  codekiddy Apr 25 '12 at 7:53

In the first example, the objects, classes and methods from std::set are explicitly accessible within your namespace (MyNamespace).

Whereas, in your second example, the objects, classes and methods from std::set are explicily available everywhere (within and without MyNamespace)

An Example, in pseudo-code (DON'T TAKE LITERALLY)

//exmaple1.cpp
//includes here

using namespace std;

namespace MyNamespace {
  //an example using cout
  //you can call cout here explicitly, like this
  cout << "Some text to print to screen << endl;
}

namespace MyOtherNamespace
{
  //an example using cout
  //you can still call cout here explicitly, like this
  cout << "Some text to print to screen << endl;
}

//example2.cpp
//includes here

namespace MyNamespace {
  using namespace std;
  //an example using cout
  //you can call cout here explicitly, like this
  cout << "Some text to print to screen << endl;
}

namespace MyOtherNamespace
{
  //an example using cout
  //you can't call cout here explicitly, because it has only
  //been defined in MyNamespace
  std::cout << "Some text to print to screen << std::endl;
}

I hope that helps

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Make sure you test code before you post it. "using std" does not work. Also, it would be good to use the OP's example, i.e. std::set. –  Martin v. Löwis Apr 25 '12 at 7:48

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