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I couldn't find out python equivalent to PHP $_SERVER.

Is there any? Or, what are the methods to bring equivalent results?

Thanks in advance.

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3  
There's a lot of differences between Python and PHP. Python is just a programming language, whereas PHP is more like a web framework, as it has primitives for web related stuff. Like $_SERVER, header, setcookie. These are things that are not in Python's core, but rather in domain-specific modules. PHP was built to be a language of the web, that's why it has so many useful things for web programming. –  Ionuț G. Stan Jun 23 '09 at 8:57
1  
Anyway, PHP is idiosyncratic, as you may access the $_SERVER superglobal even in CLI mode. It gets populated in this scenario too. –  Ionuț G. Stan Jun 23 '09 at 8:58
1  
Well... Things are changing. Python is making its way. So, it's worth it to learn and build some sites using python. –  fireball003 Jun 23 '09 at 12:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Using mod_wsgi, which I would recommend over mod_python (long story but trust me) ... Your application is passed an environment variable such as:

def application(environ, start_response):
    ...

And the environment contains typical elements from $_SERVER in PHP

...
environ['REQUEST_URI'];
...

And so on.

http://www.modwsgi.org/

Good Luck

REVISION The real correct answer is use something like Flask

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Thanks a lot. That will do :) –  fireball003 Jun 23 '09 at 12:08

You don't state it explicitly, but I assume you are using mod_python? If so, (and if you don't want to use mod_wsgi instead as suggested earlier) take a look at the documentation for the request object. It contains most of the attributes you'd find in $_SERVER.
An example, to get the full URI of the request, you'd do this:

def yourHandler(req):
    querystring=req.parsed_uri[apache.URI_QUERY]

The querystring attribute will now contain the request's querystring, that is, the part after the '?'. (So, for http://www.example.com/index?this=test, querystring would be this=test)

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