Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was watching a Google Tech Talks video and they frequently referred to Polymorphism.

What is Polymorphism, what is it for, and how is it used?

share|improve this question
4  
@John Nolan, @Aamir: It's not perfect and the user has been mainly active in tags such as php, subjective, python, regex, mysql, javascript, web development... which may not be the most related to pure OO concepts such as polymorphism. –  Daniel Daranas Jun 23 '09 at 8:22
8  
@John: +1 I agree that is a most interesting phenomenon. I'm sure that Unkwntech is not the only knowledgable, capable individual to have gaps in what others would consider to be a fundemental vocabulary. Just goes to show programming is a very wide subject. –  AnthonyWJones Jun 23 '09 at 8:22
7  
He might use it, just not give it a name. –  Aiden Bell Jun 23 '09 at 8:24
8  
@Aamir: I'm not sure that reasonable to assume that someone with 8k would know all fundementals in all areas of programming. Also I don't think it indicates the reputation system is imperfect. Someone can gain considerable reputation by asking a lot of good questions. I think our natural response to this revelation simply demonstrates the we (programmers) have a natural tendency to be a little narrow minded (not a bad thing when we need to be really good in some specific technical area) and that has its downsides. –  AnthonyWJones Jun 23 '09 at 8:28
18  
You guys seem to have have a very limited view of programming. I know guys who are doing embedded development that have no knowledge of (or need for) OO concepts at all. Their brief is to wring every last atom of performance from the code and that's it - the code they're working on will never enter the world of objects, and they're luckily close enough to retirement that they don't have to worry about learning new-fangled concepts like objects, polymorphism and variable names with more than two letters :-) –  paxdiablo Jun 23 '09 at 9:06
show 12 more comments

22 Answers 22

up vote 115 down vote accepted

If you think about the Greek roots of the term, it should become obvious.

  • Poly = many: polygon = many-sided, polystyrene = many styrenes (a), polyglot = many languages, and so on.
  • Morph = change or form: morphology = study of biological form, Morpheus = the Greek god of dreams able to take any form.

So polymorphism is the ability (in programming) to present the same interface for differing underlying forms (data types).

For example, integers and floats are implicitly polymorphic since you can add, subtract, multiply and so on, irrespective of the fact that the types are different. They're rarely considered as objects in the usual term.

But, in that same way, a class like BigDecimal or Rational or Imaginary can also provide those operations, even though they operate on different data types.

The classic example is the Shape class and all the classes that can inherit from it (square, circle, dodecahedron, irregular polygon, splat and so on).

With polymorphism, each of these classes will have different underlying data. A point shape needs only two co-ordinates (assuming it's in a two-dimensional space of course). A circle needs a center and radius. A square or rectangle needs two co-ordinates for the top left and bottom right corners (and possibly) a rotation. An irregular polygon needs a series of lines.

And, by making the class responsible for its code as well as its data, you can achieve polymorphism. In this example, every class would have its own Draw() function and the client code could simply do:

shape.Draw()

to get the correct behavior for any shape.

This is in contrast to the old way of doing things in which the code was separate from the data, and you would have had functions such as drawSquare() and drawCircle().

Object orientation, polymorphism and inheritance are all closely-related concepts and they're vital to know. There have been many "silver bullets" during my long career which basically just fizzled out but the OO paradigm has turned out to be a good one. Learn it, understand it, love it - you'll be glad you did :-)


(a) I originally wrote that as a joke but it turned out to be correct and, therefore, not that funny. The momomer styrene happens to be made from carbon and hydrogen, C8H8, and polystyrene is made from groups of that, (C8H8)n.

share|improve this answer
8  
Greek, not Latin :) (the 'y' and 'ph' are the giveaways). And in the Greek, 'morph-' is just 'shape', or 'form' - the English meaning of 'change shape' for 'morph' is a later development –  AakashM Jun 23 '09 at 9:26
4  
Polymorphism is not related to OOP, but OOP is related to polymorphism because it inherently supports it (assuming its a decent OOP language). Look at FP for other examples of polymorphism. –  alternative Apr 16 '11 at 20:27
    
I'd like to rise simple question about polymorphism. Is function that takes base type as its argument (ex void foo(Base &x) in C++) can be considered polymorphic? Note that we shouldn't consider the fact that final code will have only one body of that function since optimizer can make different bodies optimized differently and can have different behavior. Of course compiler should be able to prove that type of objects received by that function can be determined in compile time which is easy to do if your code is foo(DerivedA()); foo(DerivedB());. –  ony May 17 '13 at 9:51
    
@ony, why are you asking a question in a comment box? I'm sure there's some other way to ask questions here on SO. Let me think for a bit, ..., yes, that's right, it's the question box :-) –  paxdiablo May 17 '13 at 11:55
    
These 2 lines did the trick for me: Poly = many and Morph = change or form –  tastro May 13 at 9:48
add comment

Polymorphism is a long word for a very simple concept.

Polymorphism describes a pattern in object oriented programming in which classes have different functionality while sharing a common interface.

The beauty of polymorphism is that the code working with the different classes does not need to know which class it is using since they’re all used the same way. A real world analogy for polymorphism is a button. Everyone knows how to use a button: you simply apply pressure to it. What a button “does,” however, depends on what it is connected to and the context in which it is used — but the result does not affect how it is used. If your boss tells you to press a button, you already have all the information needed to perform the task.

In the programming world, polymorphism is used to make applications more modular and extensible. Instead of messy conditional statements describing different courses of action, you create interchangeable objects that you select based on your needs. That is the basic goal of polymorphism.

share|improve this answer
2  
isn't the button analogy related more to the concept of abstraction? –  thewpfguy Mar 29 '13 at 3:53
add comment

Polymorphism is when you can treat an object as a generic version of something, but when you access it, the code determines which exact type it is and calls the associated code.

Here is an example in C#. Create four classes within a console application:

public abstract class Vehicle
{
    public abstract int Wheels;
}

public class Bicycle : Vehicle
{
    public override int Wheels()
    {
        return 2;
    }
}

public class Car : Vehicle
{
    public override int Wheels()
    {
        return 4;
    }
}

public class Truck : Vehicle
{
    public override int Wheels()
    {
        return 18;
    }
}

Now create the following in the Main() of the module for the console application:

public void Main()
{
    System.Collections.Generic.List<Vehicle> vehicles = new System.Collections.Generic.List<Vehicle>();

    vehicles.Add(new Bicycle());
    vehicles.Add(new Car());
    vehicles.Add(new Truck());

    foreach (Vehicle v in vehicles)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(string.Format("A {0} has {1} wheels.", v.GetType().Name, v.Wheels));
    }
}

In this example, we create a list of the base class Vehicle, which does not know about how many wheels each of its sub-classes has, but does know that each sub-class is responsible for knowing how many wheels it has.

We then add a Bicycle, Car and Truck to the list.

Next, we can loop through each Vehicle in the list, and treat them all identically, however when we access each Vehicles 'Wheels' property, the Vehicle class delegates the execution of that code to the relevant sub-class.

This code is said to be polymorphic, as the exact code which is executed is determioned by the sub-class being referenced at runtime.

I hope that this helps you.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Usually this refers the the ability for an object of type A to behave like an object of type B. In object oriented programming this is usually achieve by inheritance. Some wikipedia links to read more:

EDIT: fixed broken links.

share|improve this answer
6  
"the ability for an object of type A to behave like an object of type B" - it's not accurate definition. I would say it's more like the ability to treat an object of type A like it's an object of type B. –  Artem Barger Jun 23 '09 at 8:27
    
Yes. Maybe that is a better phrasing. –  JesperE Jun 23 '09 at 8:37
    
For completeness, many language implement polymorphism through duck typing, e.g. Python. –  ilya n. Jun 29 '09 at 16:40
    
I wonder how is this related to the (popular) explanation that @Ajay Patel gave classes have different functionality while sharing a common interface –  BornToCode May 5 at 10:46
add comment

Polymorphism is the ability to treat a class of object as if it is the parent class.

For instance, suppose there is a class called Animal, and a class called Dog that inherits from Animal. Polymorphism is the ability to treat any Dog object as an Animal object like so:

Dog* dog = new Dog;
Animal* animal = dog;
share|improve this answer
    
I wonder how is this related to the (popular) explanation that @Ajay Patel gave classes have different functionality while sharing a common interface –  BornToCode May 5 at 10:44
add comment

Polymorphism:

It is the concept of object oriented programming.The ability of different objects to respond, each in its own way, to identical messages is called polymorphism.

Polymorphism results from the fact that every class lives in its own namespace. The names assigned within a class definition don’t conflict with names assigned anywhere outside it. This is true both of the instance variables in an object’s data structure and of the object’s methods:

  • Just as the fields of a C structure are in a protected namespace, so are an object’s instance variables.

  • Method names are also protected. Unlike the names of C functions, method names aren’t global symbols. The name of a method in one class can’t conflict with method names in other classes; two very different classes can implement identically named methods.

Method names are part of an object’s interface. When a message is sent requesting that an object do something, the message names the method the object should perform. Because different objects can have methods with the same name, the meaning of a message must be understood relative to the particular object that receives the message. The same message sent to two different objects can invoke two distinct methods.

The main benefit of polymorphism is that it simplifies the programming interface. It permits conventions to be established that can be reused in class after class. Instead of inventing a new name for each new function you add to a program, the same names can be reused. The programming interface can be described as a set of abstract behaviors, quite apart from the classes that implement them.

Examples:

Example-1: Here is a simple example written in Python 2.x.

class Animal:
    def __init__(self, name):    # Constructor of the class
        self.name = name
    def talk(self):              # Abstract method, defined by convention only
        raise NotImplementedError("Subclass must implement abstract method")

class Cat(Animal):
    def talk(self):
        return 'Meow!'

class Dog(Animal):
    def talk(self):
        return 'Woof! Woof!'

animals = [Cat('Missy'),
           Dog('Lassie')]

for animal in animals:
    print animal.name + ': ' + animal.talk()

Example-2: Polymorphism is implemented in Java using method overloading and method overriding concepts.

Let us Consider Car example for discussing the polymorphism. Take any brand like Ford, Honda, Toyota, BMW, Benz etc., Everything is of type Car.

But each have their own advanced features and more advanced technology involved in their move behavior.

Now let us create a basic type Car

Car.java

public class Car {

    int price;
    String name;
    String color;

    public void move(){
    System.out.println("Basic Car move");
    }

}

Let us implement the Ford Car example.

Ford extends the type Car to inherit all its members(properties and methods).

Ford.java

public class Ford extends Car{
  public void move(){
    System.out.println("Moving with V engine");
  }
}

The above Ford class extends the Car class and also implements the move() method. Even though the move method is already available to Ford through the Inheritance, Ford still has implemented the method in its own way. This is called method overriding.

Honda.java

public class Honda extends Car{
  public void move(){
    System.out.println("Move with i-VTEC engine");
  }
}

Just like Ford, Honda also extends the Car type and implemented the move method in its own way.

Method overriding is an important feature to enable the Polymorphism. Using Method overriding, the Sub types can change the way the methods work that are available through the inheritance.

PolymorphismExample.java

public class PolymorphismExample {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    Car car = new Car();
    Car f = new Ford();
    Car h = new Honda();

    car.move();
    f.move();
    h.move();

  }
}

Polymorphism Example Output:

In the PolymorphismExample class main method, i have created three objects- Car, Ford and Honda. All the three objects are referred by the Car type.

Please note an important point here that A super class type can refer to a Sub class type of object but the vice-verse is not possible. The reason is that all the members of the super class are available to the subclass using inheritance and during the compile time, the compiler tries to evaluate if the reference type we are using has the method he is trying to access.

So, for the references car,f and h in the PolymorphismExample, the move method exists from Car type. So, the compiler passes the compilation process without any issues.

But when it comes to the run time execution, the virtual machine invokes the methods on the objects which are sub types. So, the method move() is invoked from their respective implementations.

So, all the objects are of type Car, but during the run time, the execution depends on the Object on which the invocation happens. This is called polymorphism.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Polymorphism is this:

class Cup {
   int capacity
}

class TeaCup : Cup {
   string flavour
}

class CoffeeCup : Cup {
   string brand
}

Cup c = new CoffeeCup();

public int measure(Cup c) {
    return c.capacity
}

you can pass just a Cup instead of a specific instance. This aids in generality because you don't have to provide a specific measure() instance per each cup type

share|improve this answer
add comment

The term polymorphism comes from:

poly = many

morphism = the ability to change

In programming, polymorphism is a "technique" that lets you "look" at an object as being more than one type of thing. For instance:

A student object is also a person object. If you "look" (ie cast) at the student, you can probably ask for the student ID. You can't always do that with a person, right? (a person is not necessarily a student, thus might not have a student ID). However, a person probably has a name. A student does too.

Bottom line, "looking" at the same object from different "angles" can give you different "perspectives" (ie different properties or methods)

So this technique lets you build stuff that can be "looked" at from different angles.

Why do we use polymorphism? For starters ... abstraction. At this point it should be enough info :)

share|improve this answer
add comment

Let's use an analogy. For a given musical script every musician which plays it gives her own touch in the interpretation.

Musician can be abstracted with interfaces, genre to which musician belongs can be an abstrac class which defines some global rules of interpretation and every musician who plays can be modeled with a concrete class.

If you are a listener of the musical work, you have a reference to the script e.g. Bach's 'Fuga and Tocata' and every musician who performs it does it polymorphicaly in her own way.

This is just an example of a possible design (in Java):

public interface Musician {
  public void play(Work work);
}

public interface Work {
  public String getScript();
}

public class FugaAndToccata implements Work {
  public String getScript() {
    return Bach.getFugaAndToccataScript();
  }
}

public class AnnHalloway implements Musician {
  public void play(Work work) {
    // plays in her own style, strict, disciplined
    String script = work.getScript()
  }
}

public class VictorBorga implements Musician {
  public void play(Work work) {
    // goofing while playing with superb style
    String script = work.getScript()
  }
}

public class Listener {
  public void main(String[] args) {
    Musician musician;
    if (args!=null && args.length > 0 && args[0].equals("C")) {
      musician = new AnnHalloway();
    } else {
      musician = new TerryGilliam();
    }
    musician.play(new FugaAndToccata());
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

I know this is an older question with a lot of good answers but I'd like to include a one sentence answer:

Treating a derived type as if it were it's base type.

There are plenty of examples above that show this in action, but I feel this is a good concise answer.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Polymorphism is the ability of the programmer to write methods of the same name that do different things for different types of objects, depending on the needs of those objects. For example, if you were developing a class called Fraction and a class called ComplexNumber, both of these might include a method called display(), but each of them would implement that method differently. In PHP, for example, you might implement it like this:

//  Class definitions

class Fraction
{
    public $numerator;
    public $denominator;

    public function __construct($n, $d)
    {
        //  In real life, you'd do some type checking, making sure $d != 0, etc.
        $this->numerator = $n;
        $this->denominator = $d;
    }

    public function display()
    {
        echo $this->numerator . '/' . $this->denominator;
    }
}

class ComplexNumber
{
    public $real;
    public $imaginary;

    public function __construct($a, $b)
    {
        $this->real = $a;
        $this->imaginary = $b;
    }

    public function display()
    {
        echo $this->real . '+' . $this->imaginary . 'i';
    }
}


//  Main program

$fraction = new Fraction(1, 2);
$complex = new ComplexNumber(1, 2);

echo 'This is a fraction: '
$fraction->display();
echo "\n";

echo 'This is a complex number: '
$complex->display();
echo "\n";

Outputs:

This is a fraction: 1/2
This is a complex number: 1 + 2i

Some of the other answers seem to imply that polymorphism is used only in conjunction with inheritance; for example, maybe Fraction and ComplexNumber both implement an abstract class called Number that has a method display(), which Fraction and ComplexNumber are then both obligated to implement. But you don't need inheritance to take advantage of polymorphism.

At least in dynamically-typed languages like PHP (I don't know about C++ or Java), polymorphism allows the developer to call a method without necessarily knowing the type of object ahead of time, and trusting that the correct implementation of the method will be called. For example, say the user chooses the type of Number created:

$userNumberChoice = $_GET['userNumberChoice'];

switch ($userNumberChoice) {
    case 'fraction':
        $userNumber = new Fraction(1, 2);
        break;
    case 'complex':
        $userNumber = new ComplexNumber(1, 2);
        break;
}

echo "The user's number is: ";
$userNumber->display();
echo "\n";

In this case, the appropriate display() method will be called, even though the developer can't know ahead of time whether the user will choose a fraction or a complex number.

share|improve this answer
1  
That's not polymorphism. That's two classes having methods of the same name. They would need to be linked by a base class or interface called "displayable" or something similiar, and then other methods would simply care that the object is of type "displayable" rather than Complex or Fraction. –  Pod Jun 23 '09 at 9:22
    
I always thought polymorphism was "two classes having methods of the same nome." In fact, to quote Stephan Kochan (from whom I'm shameless ripping off this Fraction/Complex example), "the ability to share the same method name across different classes is known as polymorphism." (from Programming_In_Objective-C) He doesn't mention any need to link classes through a base class. Maybe it's different in different languages, I honestly don't know. –  Alex Basson Jun 23 '09 at 9:37
    
Even tough this defenition is quoted from a published book, I would still argue that it is incorrect. Especially since it seems to clash with every other, language agnostic defenition of polymorphism. And while the final result is the same as seen with polymorphism, I would argue that it is instead the dynamic typing that allows programmer be able to thrust that the correct implementation of a method among other, similary named methods is being called. –  vipirtti Jun 23 '09 at 10:15
add comment

This wikipedia article has good examples in many languages.

share|improve this answer
add comment

(I was browsing another article on something entirely different.. and polymorphism popped up... Now I thought that I knew what Polymorphism was.... but apparently not in this beautiful way explained.. Wanted to write it down somewhere.. better still will share it... )

http://www.eioba.com/a/1htn/how-i-explained-rest-to-my-wife

read on from this part:

..... polymorphism. That's a geeky way of saying that different nouns can have the same verb applied to them.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Polymorphism is an ability of object which can be taken in many forms. For example in human class a man can act in many forms when we talk about relationships. EX: A man is a father to his son and he is husband to his wife and he is teacher to his students.

share|improve this answer
add comment

In Object Oriented languages, polymorphism allows treatment and handling of different data types through the same interface. For example, consider inheritance in C++: Class B is derived from Class A. A pointer of type A* (pointer to class A) may be used to handle both an object of class A AND an object of class B.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Polymorphism is an important concept in object oriented programming which allows the programmers to know just what they must know. It is the perfect example of "sometimes less is more!"

EDIT:

Not sure why it is attracting down-votes but as far as I see; polymorphism, interfaces, delegates are all techniques of decoupling yourself from things you don't need to know. Oh yes, the word is "abstraction"...

share|improve this answer
    
I +1'd it, I have to say when I skimmed it first I thought "...know what they must know" was a smartaleck answer, and then I realised that it gets to the heart of why the issue is important. Sometimes less is more indeed. –  user8599 Jun 23 '09 at 9:06
add comment

Generally speaking, it's the ability to interface a number of different types of object using the same or a superficially similar API. There are various forms:

  • Function overloading: defining multiple functions with the same name and different parameter types, such as sqrt(float), sqrt(double) and sqrt(complex). In most languages that allow this, the compiler will automatically select the correct one for the type of argument being passed into it, thus this is compile-time polymorphism.

  • Virtual methods in OOP: a method of a class can have various implementations tailored to the specifics of its subclasses; each of these is said to override the implementation given in the base class. Given an object that may be of the base class or any of its subclasses, the correct implementation is selected on the fly, thus this is run-time polymorphism.

  • Templates: a feature of some OO languages whereby a function, class, etc. can be parameterised by a type. For example, you can define a generic "list" template class, and then instantiate it as "list of integers", "list of strings", maybe even "list of lists of strings" or the like. Generally, you write the code once for a data structure of arbitrary element type, and the compiler generates versions of it for the various element types.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Polymorphism in coding terms is when your object can exist as multiple types through inheritance etc. If you create a class named "Shape" which defines the number of sides your object has then you can then create a new class which inherits it such as "Square". When you subsequently make an instance of "Square" you can then cast it back and forward from "Shape" to "Square" as required.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I've provided a high-level overview of polymorphism for another question:

Polymorphism in c++

Hope it helps. An extract...

...it helps to start from a simple test for it and definition of [polymorphism]. Consider the code:

Type1 x;
Type2 y;

f(x);
f(y);

Here, f() is to perform some operation and is being given the values x and y as inputs. To be polymorphic, f() must be able to operate with values of at least two distinct types (e.g. int and double), finding and executing type-appropriate code.

( continued at Polymorphism in c++ )

share|improve this answer
add comment

In object-oriented programming, polymorphism refers to a programming language's ability to process objects differently depending on their data type or class. More specifically, it is the ability to redefine methods for derived classes.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Polymorphism is the ability to use an object in a given class, where all components that make up the object are inherited by subclasses of the given class. This means that once this object is declared by a class, all subclasses below it (and thier subclasses, and so on until you reach the farthest/lowest subclass) inherit the object and it's components (makeup).

Do remember that each class must be saved in separate files.

The following code exemplifies Polymorphism:

The SuperClass:

public class Parent {
    //Define things that all classes share
    String maidenName;
    String familyTree;

    //Give the top class a default method
    public void speak(){
         System.out.println("We are all Parents");
    }
}

The father, a subclass:

public class Father extends Parent{
    //Can use maidenName and familyTree here
    String name="Joe";
    String called="dad";

    //Give the top class a default method
    public void speak(){
        System.out.println("I am "+name+", the father.");
    }
}

The child, another subclass:

public class Child extends Father {
    //Can use maidenName, familyTree, called and name here

    //Give the top class a default method
    public void speak(){
        System.out.println("Hi "+called+". What are we going to do today?");
    }
}

The execution method, references Parent class to start:

public class Parenting{
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Parent parents = new Parent();
        Parent parent = new Father();
        Parent child = new Child();

        parents.speak();
        parent.speak();
        child.speak();
    }
}

Note that each class needs to be declared in separate *.java files. The code should compile. Also notice that you can continually use maidenName and familyTree farther down. That is the concept of polymorphism. The concept of inheritance is also explored here, where one class is can be used or is further defined by a subclass.

Hope this helps and makes it clear. I will post the results when I find a computer that I can use to verify the code. Thanks for the patience!

share|improve this answer
add comment

Since there are a lot of code snippets here so I'll just give an explanation

polymorphism : where an object behaves differently under different circumstances

For example take,

my aunt

aunt is an object and the relationship with me is me being her niece. She's nice to me and makes me cookies etc.

for her husband; she's a wife.

now we can see that this aunt object behaves differently. She acts as a wife . for example she clean cloths and prepare meals etc..

for her daughter she's a mother

now the aunt object behaves differently; she has the qualities of a mother.\

this is polymorphism

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.