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I am creating an auto-complete box, which uses a list of valid values (objects, not strings). The objects are bound directly and the box (both text box and drop-down parts) use a DisplayMemberPath to determine what to show as text.

I want the user to be able to type in text - if the text does not match one of the valid values, I want it to remain in the box and be flagged as invalid visually.

Now, when I bind to the view model, obviously I need to set something for this invalid value. I tried setting the value to DependencyProperty.UnsetValue. This gets returned to the VM as null.

If I later want to "clear" my form, I set the VM property to null, but of course this does not filter through to the control, as the value has not changed.

I would have expected the Property system to notice that the new value is null and the old value was UnsetValue and therefore fire the event.

Have I missed something obvious?

Thanks

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

Instead of setting DependencyProperty.UnsetValue, which has a special meaning to the WPF framework, you could create your own marker object for invalid values, like

public static Object Dummy = new Object();

Instead of Object, you should probably use the same class that your valid values have. Now, when you reset the VM, the value will really change, and WPF will notice the difference.

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Your answer is - depressingly - probably the closest to a solution. UnsetValue should mean that when null is provided from the binding source, it is reapplied. However, this does not happen, rendering UnsetValue exactly the same as null, which completely defeats its purpose (according to MSDN). –  Stephen Drew May 8 '12 at 23:33
    
There is also a special value Binding.DoNothing, but that won't help you either, because as far as I have understood, you want the VM property to change, so the VM knows there is an invalid value, don't you? –  hbarck May 9 '12 at 16:24
    
No, the VM should just have null if there's an invalid value. But I want the CONTROL to know if it has an invalid value and to clear it when it is reset to null. I thought that if internally, the DP was set to UnsetValue, then it was set to null from the VM, this would come through as a property change, but it does not. This renders UnsetValue completely useless from my POV. –  Stephen Drew May 10 '12 at 7:54

A simple and validation-framework independent way of doing this would be to let the VM do the work.

E.g.

public class MyVM : MyBaseVM
{
    private ObservableCollection<Object> _items
        = new ObservableCollection<Object>();
    public ObservableCollection<Object> Items
    {
        get
        {
            return _items;
        }
    }

    private string _text;
    public string Text
    {
        get
        {
            return _text;
        }
        set
        {
            _text = value;
            Validate();

            if (_isValid)
                _model.Text = value;

            NotifyPropertyChanged("Text");
        }
    }

    private bool _isValid = true;
    public bool IsValid
    {
        get
        {
            return _isValid;
        }
        private set
        {
            _isValid = value;
            NotifyPropertyChanged("IsValid");
        }
    }

    private void Validate()
    {
        IsValid = _items.Any(i =>
            i.ToString().ToLower() == _text.ToLower().Trim());
    }
}
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But I would need all of this code for each property that might use this control, and in addition I bind directly to an object and use a display member path rather than binding to a string :( –  Stephen Drew May 7 '12 at 13:23
    
@Steve you could create a sub-VM using the same class per property. Also please refactor your question to make the conditions more transparent. –  Danny Varod May 7 '12 at 13:48
    
Thanks, I updated the question. Yes, it looks like this is the only way forward. It's unfortunate as I though using UnsetValue might yield some results so I wouldn't have to over-engineer the view model. –  Stephen Drew May 7 '12 at 19:05

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