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I have many columns like this:

select when from t1 where when LIKE '2002-01-02 %'\G
*************************** 1. row ***************************
when: 2002-01-02 02:13:14
*************************** 2. row ***************************
when: 2002-01-02 02:15:31
*************************** 3. row ***************************
when: 2002-01-02 02:19:42

I am trying to increment the date and time with 10 years, 3 month, 22 days, and 13 hours, 10 minutes, so that it will look something like:

2012-04-24 15:23:14
2012-04-24 15:25:31
2012-04-24 15:29:42

Searched and found ways ( ADDDATE ) to increase either only the year, or month ... but how can I do for all the year, month, date, and time ?

If it can be done in a single query it would great, but anything is fine .. Thanks for your time.

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Do you actually have a column named "when" ? –  ypercube Apr 25 '12 at 9:36
    
@ypercube, possible as it is no reserved mysql keyword. Otherwise using `` will do. –  Mike de Klerk Nov 29 '12 at 13:28
    
@Mike: WHEN is reserved, even from MySQL 5.0 version, according to MySQL docs: Reserved words in 5.0 –  ypercube Nov 29 '12 at 13:31
    
@ypercube, thanks for pointing that out! –  Mike de Klerk Nov 29 '12 at 19:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can use something like this -

SELECT datetime + INTERVAL 10 YEAR + INTERVAL 3 MONTH + INTERVAL 22 DAY
       + INTERVAL 10 HOUR + INTERVAL 30 MINUTE AS new_date_time FROM table
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works... thank you very much. –  user379997 Apr 25 '12 at 9:48

If your server is version 5.5 or newer you can use TO_SECONDS combined with UNIX_TIMESTAMP and FROM_UNIXTIME:

SELECT FROM_UNIXTIME(UNIX_TIMESTAMP(when) + TO_SECONDS('0010-03-22 13:10:00')) new_when 
FROM t1
WHERE when LIKE '2002-01-02 %'
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