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I tested the following code:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

class foo {
public:
    int m_data;
    foo(int data) : m_data(data) {
        std::cout << "parameterised constructor" << std::endl;
    }
    foo(const foo &other) : m_data(other.m_data) {
        std::cout << "copy constructor" << std::endl;
    }
};

main (int argc, char *argv[]) {
    std::vector<foo> a(3, foo(3));
    std::vector<foo> b(4, foo(4));
    //std::vector<foo> b(3, foo(4));
    std::cout << "a = b" << std::endl;
    a = b;
    return 0;
}

I get

   parameterised constructor
   copy constructor
   copy constructor
   copy constructor
   parameterised constructor
   copy constructor
   copy constructor
   copy constructor
   copy constructor
   a = b
   copy constructor
   copy constructor
   copy constructor
   copy constructor

However, if I replace std::vector<foo> b(4, foo(4)); by std::vector<foo> b(3, foo(4)); the copy constructor is not called by a = b and the output is

parameterised constructor
copy constructor
copy constructor
copy constructor
parameterised constructor
copy constructor
copy constructor
copy constructor
a = b

Why is in this case the copy constructor not called?

I'm using g++ (Ubuntu/Linaro 4.6.1-9ubuntu3) 4.6.1

share|improve this question
    
This is really odd... It's even reproducible at ideone... –  RedX Apr 25 '12 at 10:37
    
Sooo cool. :) I also reproduced that, though I didn't believe it. –  Boris Strandjev Apr 25 '12 at 10:39
    
maybe the compiler simply moves b to a since b is not use after the assignment? Have you tried to do something with b after a=b (printing, etc)? –  user396672 Apr 25 '12 at 10:40
    
@user396672 it is not that. I tried it. –  Boris Strandjev Apr 25 '12 at 10:42
    
The current standard is C++11, but not everyone is using a C++11 compiler, and the answer might depend on which version of the standard you are targeting so you should make that explicit in the question. Also, just for the sake of it, add the compiler and version, as the implementations of the STL will differ slightly within the bounds of the standard. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Apr 25 '12 at 12:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

In the first case, a needs to grow when you assign to it, which means that all its elements must be reallocated (and therefore destructed and constructed).

In the second case, a does not need to grow, hence the assignment operator is used.

See http://ideone.com/atPt9; adding an overloaded copy assignment operator that prints a message, we get the following for the second example:

parameterised constructor
copy constructor
copy constructor
copy constructor
parameterised constructor
copy constructor
copy constructor
copy constructor
a = b
copy assignment
copy assignment
copy assignment
share|improve this answer
    
However, as we know, the vector structure reserves some spare elements, in order to assure amortized constant speeds of its operations. Why then copy constructor is used every time nevermind the initial sizes of a and b? –  Boris Strandjev Apr 25 '12 at 11:13
    
@Boris: it isn't used nevermind the initial sizes. The whole point of the question is that with one pair of initial sizes it is used, and with another it isn't. Try std::vector<foo> a(3, foo(3)); std::vector<foo> b(4, foo(4)); a.reserve(4); a = b;. Assuming Oli's explanation is correct, I think that should copy construct 3 times during the reserve and then copy-construct once during the assignment (and copy-assign three times). If you're on C++11, then normally the reserve can move instead of copying, but IIRC a user-defined constructor suppresses the default move constructor. –  Steve Jessop Apr 25 '12 at 11:25
    
@BorisStrandjev: Using the vector(count, T) constructor, the capacity is set to count (not sure if that's standard-mandated, or implementation-specific). See e.g. ideone.com/jngf9. –  Oli Charlesworth Apr 25 '12 at 11:32
    
I've tried std::vector<foo> a(3, foo(3)); std::vector<foo> b(4, foo(3)); and std::vector<foo> c(3, foo(2)); and then a=b; a=c; a=b;. In the third case I get 3 assignment and 1 copy calls –  Michael Apr 25 '12 at 11:37
    
@me after a=c the capacity of a remains 4, therefore the second a=b does not need to allocate new memory and only the last object needs to be (copy) constructed –  Michael Apr 25 '12 at 14:06

It is using the assignment operator.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

class foo {
public:
    int m_data;
    foo(int data) : m_data(data) {
        std::cout << "parameterised constructor " << m_data << std::endl;
    }
    foo(const foo &other) : m_data(other.m_data) {
        std::cout << "copy constructor " << m_data << " " << other.m_data << std::endl;
    }

    foo& operator= (const foo& other){
        std::cout << "assignment operator " << m_data << " " << other.m_data << std::endl;
    }
};

main (int argc, char *argv[]) {
    std::vector<foo> a(3, foo(3));
    //std::vector<foo> b(4, foo(4));
    std::vector<foo> b(3, foo(4));
    std::cout << "a = b" << std::endl;
    a = b;

    for(std::vector<foo>::const_iterator it = a.begin(); it != a.end(); ++it){
        std::cout << "a " << it->m_data << std::endl;
    }
    for(std::vector<foo>::const_iterator it = b.begin(); it != b.end(); ++it){
        std::cout << "b " << it->m_data << std::endl;
    }
    return 0;
}
parameterised constructor 3
copy constructor 3 3
copy constructor 3 3
copy constructor 3 3
parameterised constructor 4
copy constructor 4 4
copy constructor 4 4
copy constructor 4 4
a = b
assignment operator 3 4
assignment operator 3 4
assignment operator 3 4
a 3
a 3
a 3
b 4
b 4
b 4

See Olis answer for why.

share|improve this answer
    
@SteveJessop you are right, i corrected it. –  RedX Apr 25 '12 at 11:33

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