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I have a pretty simple helper method to generate a unique code. To ensure that codes are unique I execute a LINQ to Entities query to verify that it isn't already in use.

My first attempt at writing this method worked perfectly:

public string GenerateUniqueSignUpCode()
{
    while( true )
    {
        var code = Path.GetRandomFileName().Substring( 0, 6 ).ToUpper();
        if( !Context.Users.Any(e => e.SignUpCode.ToUpper() == code) )
            return code;
    }
}

However, R# suggested that the LINQ expression could be simplified, which resulted in this method:

public string GenerateUniqueSignUpCode()
{
    while( true )
    {
        var code = Path.GetRandomFileName().Substring( 0, 6 ).ToUpper();
        if( Context.Users.All(e => e.SignUpCode.ToUpper() != code) )
            return code;
    }
}

This rewrite causes an infinite loop. The database does not contain any 6-character codes when the code is run so it should exit the loop on the first attempt (as does the first method shown).

Is All broken in EF 4.3.1 or what's going on?

share|improve this question
    
If Jon's right, and this turns out to be a mis-refactor by R# then I suggest you report it to them too. Although I realise it may to be difficult to spot when a condition like this is evaluated as SQL instead! –  Rup Apr 25 '12 at 11:41
    
I suppose it's a common enough case that they might consider it - will add an issue for it and see what happens. –  Morten Mertner Apr 25 '12 at 12:51
    
Issue added: youtrack.jetbrains.com/issue/RSRP-297527 –  Morten Mertner Apr 25 '12 at 13:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

My guess is that this will happen if SignupCode is null for any entry. The comparison using != won't give a "true" result, so All will return false.

Just a guess, but it's the kind of thing I've seen before. You could try:

if (Context.Users.All(e => e.SignUpCode == null ||
                           e.SignUpCode.ToUpper() != code))
share|improve this answer
    
You're quite right - adding the null check makes it work. Not particularly intuitive that this is required though. –  Morten Mertner Apr 25 '12 at 12:49
    
@MortenMertner: Nope, I'd agree with that :) –  Jon Skeet Apr 25 '12 at 12:51

Context.Users.All(e => e.SignUpCode.ToUpper() != code should throw null reference exception if SignUpCode is null.

I guess expression is all fine. Data behind should have the problem

share|improve this answer
    
"should throw null reference exception if SignUpCode is null" if the expression is evaluated in C#, yes - but it's probably being transformed into SQL for evaluation which changes the null-handling semantics. –  Rup Apr 25 '12 at 11:38

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