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I'm working on a python script which retrieves values from an sdict as a string value. Many of the returned values contain a timestamp depending on the sdict, which is a tad annoying.

Eg. <2006-12-20 00:10:24 Cattle is a tree>

I cannot for the life of me, figure out how to remove the 2006-12-20 00:10:24 from the returned value. Has anyone got any ideas? I was thinking I could strip anything between - characters. However, the returned values often contain - throughout.

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1  
Could you be more precise about the values you're working with? Are they all strings consisting of a "<", then a timestamp in that format, then a space, then some other stuff, then a ">"? Or is there more variation than that? For that matter, are you certain that the values you're retrieving really are strings? (It's not uncommon for non-string objects to be displayed in ways that look like what you've shown here.) – Gareth McCaughan Apr 25 '12 at 12:27
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What have you tried already, and how did it fail? – Gareth McCaughan Apr 25 '12 at 12:27
    
docs.python.org/library/re.html – zrxq Apr 25 '12 at 12:28
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Try using regular expressions to match the pattern of the dates. – dougk Apr 25 '12 at 12:28
    
Look at re.sub ( docs.python.org/library/re.html#re.sub ) If you don't know re, no better time to learn! – mgilson Apr 25 '12 at 12:28
up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is a good candidate for using regular expressions.

>>> import re
>>> s = '<2006-12-20 00:10:24 Cattle is a tree>'
>>> re.sub(r'\d{4}-\d{2}-\d{2} \d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2} ', '', s)
'<Cattle is a tree>'
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Thank you! this worked spot on :) – abkai Apr 25 '12 at 12:31

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