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I wanted to know the execution time of a program, but I also wanted to exclude the time needed for file input/output. For this purpose I used the time() function. There are many .h and .cpp files but here are the only places where time objects are referenced.

My problem is, while start's value is set correctly at the beginning it loses it (is set to zero) when dosomethingelse() is invoked for the first time. This makes sub_duration to have a very big value because now the difference between end and start , which is zero, is the value of end.

Here is how I used it:

main.cpp

time_t start=0;
time_t end=0;
time_t sub_duration=0;
time_t total_duration=0; 

int main()
{
    start = time(NULL);
    while(somethingtodo)
    {
        dosomething();
        dosomethingelse();
    }
    end = time(NULL);
    sub_duration = difftime(end,start);
    total_duration += sub_duration;
}

dosth.h

   extern      time_t start;
   extern      time_t end;
   extern      time_t sub_duration;
   extern      time_t total_duration;
   dosomethingelse();

dosth.cpp

#include"dosth.h"    
dosomethingelse()
{
    if(somecondition)
    {
        end = time(NULL);
        sub_duration = difftime(end,start);
        total_duration += sub_duration;
        writesomethingTofile();
        start = time(NULL);
    }
}
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1  
Did you try putting in some printf() statements, or tracing through in a debugger, to see where you first got an unexpected value? –  Tony D Apr 25 '12 at 12:45
    
@TonyDelroy: yes i have traced it. it losses it value on the first function call to dosmethingelse(). At the first line of this function start has lost its value. –  John Apr 25 '12 at 12:50
    
it sounds like you're not seeing the same start variable... perhaps print out the address of start inside main() (i.e. printf("start is at @%p\n", &start)) and again inside dosth.cpp so you can compare. More generally, it's better to have one timing.h/.c pair with the header providing say void start(); int elapsed_second_and_reset(); and all the time_t variables private to timing.c. –  Tony D Apr 25 '12 at 13:01
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The problem is that start and end are global... when you set them inside dosomethingelse(), you're re-setting the start for the whole program.

The solution is to keep a local timer inside dosomethingelse(), and subtract the time spent in that function from the total.

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« start » is changed into « main » and « dosomethingelse » functions. Why did you do that ?

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