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I want to raise an "event" that shows up in the system event viewer (eventvwr.exe) from .NET.

Unfortunately, Google is just giving me lots of other stuff about "events" which aren't the sort of events I want to raise.

What is the correct API call?

Update Thanks for the answers so far. Interestingly, I have found that calls to "LogEvent" work with a new source even if I have not created the source. i.e.

// The following works even though I haven't created "SomeNewSource"
EventLog.WriteEntry("SomeNewSource", message);

Can anyone explain why that is?

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Have a look at this article –  tanascius Jun 23 '09 at 9:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You call CreateEventSource if the source does not already exist and then use WriteEntry to write to the log. There are a couple of things to keep in mind, though.

CreateEventSource will need admin access the first time the program is run. I always just keep a short command-line program around that takes the Event Source as an argument. Run it as admin during installation just once, and then your program can write events without problem under an appropriate level of access.

WriteEntry also takes an entry type and an error number, like:

myEventLog.WriteEntry("Health Check. Program started normally",EventLogEntryType.Info,1011);

or

myEventLog.WriteEntry("Error. Could not open database connection!",EventLogEntryType.Error,1012);

These can be helpful, since monitoring systems like Microsoft Operations Manager can be set to watch these and notify you or the persons on call. I usually create a unique set of error numbers so that the sysadmins know who to call; me, a dba, a vendor's help line to report their web service down, and so on. Saves you a lot of 2AM calls.

Here's a sample:

using System.Diagnostics;
class TestClass
{
	private EventLog log;

	public TestClass()
	{
		if(!EventLog.SourceExists("TestApplication"))
		{
			EventLog.CreateEventSource("TestApplication","Application");
		}
		log=new EventLog("Application",".","TestApplication");
	}

	public int ParseFile(StreamReader sr)
	{
		string[] lines=sr.ReadToEnd().Trim().Split('\n');
		int linecount=lines.Length;
		string connString=System.Configuration.ConfigurationSettings.AppSettings["ConnectString"];
		SqlConnection conn=new SqlConnection(connString);
		try
		{
			conn.Open();
		}
		catch (Exception e)
		{
			log.WriteEntry("Cannot connect to database for file import: "+e.Message, EventLogEntryType.Error,1171);
			return linecount;
		}
		// write to database, etc.
	}
}
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Would be good if you could add a sampel code fragment with using System.Diagnostics etc... for the record. The other answer doesn't mention the potential race condition between creating the event source and using it. And links can get broken. –  Paul Hollingsworth Jun 23 '09 at 13:09
    
You are correct. I'll edit the response to clarify. –  R Ubben Jun 23 '09 at 13:59
using System;
using System.Diagnostics;

namespace Test
{
    class TestEventLog
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            string source = "MyApplication";

            if (!EventLog.SourceExists(source))
            {
                EventLog.CreateEventSource(source,"Application");
            }

            EventLog.WriteEntry(source, "Here is an event-log message");
        }
    }
}
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Have a look at System.Diagnostics.EventLog.

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