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For my research I need to deal with huge text file (10gi) of biological sequences (fasta format) and more precisely I have to put into specials specific sequences with specifics id. a fasta sequence is something like that:

>id|id_number (e.g. 102574)|stuff

ATGCGAT.... ATGTC.. (multiple lines)

so i wrote script to search into chunks of these big files in order to paralelize my search (and to use my 8 cpu) with the multiprocessing library of python

the function that I inject into my multiprocess class is the following:

idlist=inP[0] # list of good id 
    filpath=inP[1] # chunck of the big file
    idproc=inP[2]   # id of the process

    #######################
    fil=filpath.split('\n')
    del filpath
    f=open('seqwithid{0}'.format(idproc),'w')
    def lineiter():
        for line in fil:
            yield line
    it=lineiter()
    line=it.next()

    while 1:
        try:
            ids=line.split('|')[1].split('locus')[0].partition('ref')[0]
            #print ids
            while ids[0].isalpha():
                ids=ids[1:]
        except Exception:
            pass
        else:
            if ids in idlist: 
                f.write(line+'\n')
                while 1:
                    try:
                        line=it.next()
                    except Exception:
                        break
                    if line and line[0]!='>':
                        f.write(line+'\n')
                    else:
                        break
        try:                
            line=it.next()
        except Exception:
            break
        while  not line or line[0]!='>':
            try:
                line=it.next()
            except Exception:
                break
    f.close()

In order to improve the speed i reworte this piece of code in C with 4 functions:

I cut the file into chunk:

f1=fopen(adr, "r");
if (f1==0){printf("wrong sequences file: %s\n",adr);exit(1);}

fstream = (char *) malloc((end-begin)*sizeof(char) );
fseek(f1,begin,SEEK_CUR);
fread(fstream,sizeof(char)*(end-begin-1),1,f1);
adrtampon=fgetc(f1);

while (!(feof(f1)) && adrtampon!=ter)
{
    sprintf(fstream,"%s%c",fstream,adrtampon);
    adrtampon=fgetc(f1);
}
fclose(f1);

I use run trought the chunk with a main function until find a '>' character:

adrtampon=fstream[0];   
i=0;

while(adrtampon!='\0' )
{
    adrtampon=fstream[i];
    if (adrtampon==ter)
    {
        sprintf(id,"%s",seekid((fstream+i)));

        if (checkidlist(id,tab,size)==0) 
        {
            i++;
            fputc('>',f2);
            adrtampon=fstream[i];
            while (adrtampon!='\0' &&  adrtampon!=ter)  
            {
                fputc(adrtampon,f2);
                i++;
                adrtampon=fstream[i];
            }
            i--;
        }
    }
    i++;
}

and when i find '>' i first extract the id of the sequence between the two '|' and then i loop my librairy of intersting id with another simple function (similarly to the if ids in idlist) This function is then called with a python function still using multiprocessing class And finally... I obtain worst perf with the C code than the python code, even with one process. (When i deal directly with the file and not with chunks I obtain better perf with C but only with one process because of the concurent access to the file of the multiprocess (i think) ) Any suggestion to improve my C code and to explain why it is slower than the equivalent in python????? thanks a lot!! (especially if you have readen until here!)

share|improve this question
    
What is begin,end,ter? Also: the way you use feof() is wrong, and your "fstream" string is not nul-terminated by fread(). –  wildplasser Apr 25 '12 at 13:00
1  
It is often hard to identify performance bottlenecks by looking at the code, especially by looking at an uncompilable code fragment. I suggest using a profiler. –  n.m. Apr 25 '12 at 13:07
    
My guess is that he is searching for the '>' character for every character processed, resulting in O(N*N) behaviour. Also: his strings are probably not nul-terminated. –  wildplasser Apr 25 '12 at 13:13
    
end begin delimitate the chunk into the big file: begin is used with fseek and end is used as a marker to finish the construction of the chunk. and yes i am looking for every '>' by testing every char –  oliverXoX Apr 26 '12 at 10:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Probably a 10GB file won't fit into memory (if it would fit into memory you could do it like I did here.) So the only way to read and process it is: read a part, process that part, read the next part. If linelength is limited, fgets() is the most elegant. Otherwise, you could read one character at a time and use a small statemachine to do the processing. Reading buffer-sized chunks is possible but harder, because logical lines will cross buffer boundaries.

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