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I have recently learned about PDO and and Doctrine 2.2.2 to build an application. but i'will work with some critical constraints in my environment( a lot of data , connexion speed ...etc) i know that Doctrine have a PDO layer,so maybe PDO is faster but i want to work with a Real ORM Framework like Hibernate.

after reading this post Benchmark PDO vs Doctrine

I have to know if Doctrine is [ very ] slow than PDO.

Thank you

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Comparing PDO with Doctrine is like comparing apples with apple trees. Also note, that Doctrine2 is faster –  KingCrunch Apr 25 '12 at 13:12
    
you are right , i know what you mean ; but i just need to know how much Doctrine is slow. thanks for your comment. –  GENE Apr 25 '12 at 14:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 22 down vote accepted

Doctrine 2 + PHP 5.3+ improved greatly the speed of Doctrine.

However, you will never be close to PDO beacause it is not the same thing : do you want to query your database or do you want to automatically map your database to PHP Objects and then use objects in your code ?

  • For development quality, ease and speed : use Doctrine
  • For runtime speed : don't use an ORM
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Thanks a lot ..i think i going to use doctrine 2 –  GENE Apr 25 '12 at 15:06
    
@adrien +1 for the two points. –  ravz Dec 22 '12 at 12:46
    
After working on at-least 3 to 4 projects. I experienced that PDO is much much faster. For UX perspective I always choose PDO over ORM. You can always write neat and understandable code with normal SQL queries using DBAL layer. –  doNotCheckMyBlog Jul 9 at 2:08

Using a PHP cache like APC will improve Doctrine's performance a lot. From what I've seen; somewhere between 3-7 times.
If you can't use a cache, you could easily switch to Doctrine's DBAL layer instead of the ORM in areas where you really need all the speed you can get. Runtime speeds will then be a lot closer to PDO, but you will lose the convenience of an ORM.

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