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How can I directly call a ruby function from the command-line?

Imagine, I would have this script test.rb:

class TestClass
    def self.test_function(some_var)
        puts "I got the following variable: #{some_var}"
    end
end

If this script is run from the command-line (ruby test.rb), nothing happens (as intended).

Is there something like ruby test.rb TestClass.test_function('someTextString')? I want to get the following output: I got the following variable: someTextString.

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1  
I know your test.rb is just some example code but the class name really should be Pascal Case TestClass and you should be defining def self.testFunction(someVar) if you are calling it without instantiating your class. And you probably want to call ruby test.rb from the command line instead of ruby test.py. =) – Charles Caldwell Apr 25 '12 at 13:27
1  
Ruby supports string interpolation: "I got the following variable: #{some_var}" – Matheus Moreira Apr 25 '12 at 13:43
up vote 47 down vote accepted

First the name of the class needs to start with a capital letter, and since you really want to use a static method, the function name definition needs to start with self..

class TestClass
    def self.test_function(someVar)
        puts "I got the following variable: " + someVar
    end
end

Then to invoke that from the command line you can do:

ruby -r "./test.rb" -e "TestClass.test_function 'hi'"

If you instead had test_function as an instance method, you'd have:

class TestClass
    def test_function(someVar)
        puts "I got the following variable: " + someVar
    end
end

then you'd invoke it with:

ruby -r "./test.rb" -e "TestClass.new.test_function 'hi'"
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9  
+1 :). Also. CamelCase for methods and variable names are non-Ruby style. Use undersore: test_function, some_var – fl00r Apr 25 '12 at 13:32
    
@fl00r Good point! I updated the answer. – Candide May 2 '12 at 17:15

Here's another variation, if you find that typing ruby syntax at the command line is awkward and you really just want to pass args to ruby. Here's test.rb:

#!/usr/bin/env ruby

class TestClass
  def self.test_function(some_var)
    puts "I got the following variable: #{some_var}"
  end
end

TestClass.test_function(ARGV[0])

Make test.rb executable and run it like this:

./test.rb "Some Value"

Or run it like this:

ruby test.rb "Some Value"

This works because ruby automatically sets the ARGV array to the arguments passed to the script. You could use ARGV[0] or ARGV.first to get the first argument, or you could combine the args into a single string, separated by spaces, using ARGV.join(' ').

If you're doing lots of command-line stuff, you may eventually have a use for Shellwords, which is in the standard ruby lib.

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1  
Usually you'd wrap the top-level code into if __FILE__ == $0. – Niklas B. Apr 25 '12 at 18:05

If you are working on a command line interface, then I would suggest to have a look at thor.

Thor directly maps your commands to methods within the defined class, see the thor wiki for an example.

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class A
  def run
    p :Hello_world
  end
  self
end.new.run

The usual way to script Ruby is to just use the top level execution environment called main. You can just start defining methods and code you write outside of a class, and these will be executed directly. (BTW, code inside a class but outside any method will run "by itself" also.)

Anyway, I'm with you ... I like writing all code in a named class and instantiating that class, so you can combine the techniques .. have the class return its own object .. and then use just a little of that top level code to allocate, initialize, and then dot into the class.

With this, you can just type $ ruby test.rb and it will do what you want. You can add a shebang if you want it to be directly executable.

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Just an extension to Ingenu's answer for the case that the function does not print something out, but does return something.

We would have the following test.rb

class TestClass
    def self.test_function(some_var)
        return "I got the following variable: " + some_var
    end
end

Then to invoke that from the command line and get the return value:

ruby -r "./test.rb" -e "puts TestClass.test_function('hi')"
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