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I installed MySQL and was playing around with the password settings trying to get Wordpress to connect to it. In doing so, I seem to have hashed my root password and now cannot login.

I'm trying to reset the password by running

/etc/init.d/mysqld stop

Then

mysqld_safe --skip-grant-tables

Which outputs

Starting mysql daemon with databases from /var/lib/mysql

But then does nothing. It neither succeeds nor fails. I've not got any databases setup so I'd be happy to remove and reinstall mysql if necessary but I tried that to no avail. How can I get back in?

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If you reinstall it, the password should be gone and you should be able to access it. –  CoffeeRain Apr 25 '12 at 14:45
    
Exactly what I ended up doing...hit it with a hammer. –  jcpeden Apr 26 '12 at 8:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

mysqld_safe is the command to start the mysql engine. It's not supposed to do or show anything after the line saying that it's started mysql. Once you've run mysqld_safe, the next step is to run mysql. Because you started mysqld with --skip-grant-tables you won't need to specify a username or password.

You can then give the command to reset root's password. For instructions on how to set a password, see http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/set-password.html .

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It wasn't allowing me to input anything else though, the system would just hang. –  jcpeden Apr 26 '12 at 8:32
    
Is the entire system hanging? Or do you just mean that the terminal you typed mysqld_safe into didn't do anything? That is what's supposed to happen. You need to open a new terminal and then run mysql. –  octern Apr 26 '12 at 17:06
    
Thanks for explaining this more clearly! –  jcpeden Sep 26 '12 at 8:19

have you tried "mysqld --skip-grant-tables" instead of mysqld_safe? make sure to kill any mysqld threads that didn't die before starting mysqld --skip-grant-tables. Do a ps -ef and grep for mysql, kill -9 any mysql process, then start it --skip-grants-tables.

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Didn't try starting it out of safe mode and tried to kill any processes but I couldn't find anything to kill, I'm pretty sure the process must have been running already and the system didn't like being told to start it again. Just confusing that there was no error message. –  jcpeden Apr 26 '12 at 8:32
    
does the mysqld_safe log anything in the error.log or messages? Is there a mysqld process running after you start it in safe mode or with --skip-grant-tables? if you strace the mysqld pid what does the strace show? –  MichaelN May 15 '12 at 13:06

How to turn off this "safe" option after configuring mysql? After restarting mysqld there is no checking privileges. Is there any option like "--with-grant-tables"?

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