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I am creating a web application framework to be used by other groups in my department to standardize the UI of our web apps. It's written in javascript using HTML templating through underscore.js. In order for the app to be totally extensible however, I'd like them to be able to extend HTML templates as they see fit without modifying the source.


Source

templates.html

...
<script type="text/template" id="fooTemplate">
  <div class="foo">
  </div>
</script>
<script type="text/template" id="barTemplate">
  <p>Bar!</p>
</script>
...

Implementation

newTemplates.html

...
<!-- Only overwrite foo, not bar !-->
<script type="text/template" id="fooTemplate">
  <ul class="foo">
    <li class="bar">Blah!</li>
  </ul>
</script>
...

Is there a way to intuitively enable users to extend HTML templates without forcing them to overwrite the file and copy/paste the templates they're not modifying?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're not going to be able to use id attributes to identify your templates without a bunch of server-side processing to take care of the uniqueness issues. But you can use classes to identify your templates.

If you mash all your template HTML files together in override order ("base" templates first, "subtemplates" after) and use class attributes to identify the templates:

<!-- templates.html -->
<script type="text/template" id="fooTemplate">
  <div class="foo">
  </div>
</script>
<script type="text/template" id="barTemplate">
  <p>Bar!</p>
</script>
<!-- newTemplates.html -->
<script type="text/template" id="fooTemplate">
  <ul class="foo">
    <li class="bar">Blah!</li>
  </ul>
</script>

Then you can use things like

var foo = _.template($('.fooTemplate:last').html());
var bar = _.template($('.barTemplate:last').html());

to access your templates.

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/ambiguous/gYHkF/


You could also stick with ids and try to load templates from newTemplates.html first and fallback to templates.html if you don't find it. If you load the template files into two separate variables but don't insert them into the DOM:

var $base = $('stuff from templates.html');
var $subs = $('stuff from newTemplates.html');

Then add a simple function to look for templates in $subs before $base:

function tmpl(id) {
    var $t = $subs.filter('#' + id);
    if($t.length)
        return _.template($t.html());
    return _.template($base.filter('#' + id).html());
}

Then you could do this:

var foo = tmpl('fooTemplate');
var bar = tmpl('barTemplate');

and The Right Thing would happen.

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/ambiguous/EhhsL/

This approach also makes it easy to cache the compiled templates and not only avoid double lookups but avoid compiling the same thing over and over again:

function tmpl(id) {
    if(tmpl.cache.hasOwnProperty(id))
        return tmpl.cache[id];
    var $t = $subs.filter('#' + id);
    if($t.length)
        return tmpl.cache[id] = _.template($t.html());
    return tmpl.cache[id] = _.template($base.filter('#' + id).html());
}
tmpl.cache = { };

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/ambiguous/YpcJu/

share|improve this answer
    
I really love the second solution- how much of a performance penalty do you think that would cause though? – stinkycheeseman Apr 25 '12 at 18:55
1  
@stinkycheeseman: The performance hit probably wouldn't be noticeable but you could slip a little bit of caching in (as in my update) pretty easily. – mu is too short Apr 25 '12 at 19:31

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