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I have a bunch of textfile that looks like this:

His doctor attributed this to an allergy .

That hardly convinced him , as he had no history of allergies of any kind .
" Yet , that was to be the least of his problems .
I may have to take steroids for the rest of my life .
"
A topical steroid spray was later added to his repertoire of drugs and 
" he knew it was merely masking the underlying condition .
"

And I want to change it such that the . " are in a single line. The desired output should look like this:

His doctor attributed this to an allergy .

That hardly convinced him , as he had no history of allergies of any kind .
" Yet , that was to be the least of his problems .
I may have to take steroids for the rest of my life . "
A topical steroid spray was later added to his repertoire of drugs and 
" he knew it was merely masking the underlying condition . "

I've tried this but it doesn't work:

sed -i 's/.\n"\n/. "\n/g'

Can someone help me out on the correct sed command to shift the " up?

share|improve this question
    
The reason it doesn't work is that sed works on lines separately. –  Lev Levitsky Apr 25 '12 at 15:02
    
so is there any other non-sed way to solve it?? –  alvas Apr 25 '12 at 15:05
    
This will force the second line with the " to come up. You cannot explicitly look for newlines. Now, to get rid of the quote and join the two lines is the next step. When trying to replace or search for \n, use $ instead. Here is what will treat both lines continuously. I saw the perl solution, and that might be a good way to go. sed -e '/\.$/ { N /"/p}' test.txt There is a line break between N and /"/p}'. –  octopusgrabbus Apr 25 '12 at 15:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is what I figured out:

sed -n '1{h;d};/^"$/{g;s/$/ "/p;n;h;d};x;p;${g;p}' input.txt

output

His doctor attributed this to an allergy .

That hardly convinced him , as he had no history of allergies of any kind .
" Yet , that was to be the least of his problems .
I may have to take steroids for the rest of my life . "
A topical steroid spray was later added to his repertoire of drugs and
" he knew it was merely masking the underlying condition . "
share|improve this answer
    
but i need to keep the rest of the \n, only the ones with "\n needs to be truncated. –  alvas Apr 25 '12 at 14:56
    
thanks it works wonders!! but why does that work? and why does it need such a complicated regex? –  alvas Apr 25 '12 at 15:16
    
Just like programming in assembly language. You should keep track of every tiny step. –  kev Apr 25 '12 at 15:19
    
h;d;g;x;p are sed command. You can type man sed to read more about them. –  kev Apr 25 '12 at 15:21
    
Just one last problem, how do i sed and write it for a bunch of files? previously i was using sed -i ... * to change regex in my txtfiles. -n only displays the text -i with your regex only writes messed up the txtfiles. –  alvas Apr 25 '12 at 15:22
perl -00 -lpe 's/\n"$/"/mg'

produces the desired output.

share|improve this answer

A slightly different sed variant:

sed -n '1{h};1!{/"$/!H};/"$/{H;g;s/\.[ \n]*"$/\. "/;p;n;x}' input.txt
  • 1 { h } — put first line into the hold buffer
  • 1! { /"$/ !H } — for the rest of the lines, accumulate into hold buffer if no lonely "
  • /"$/ { H; g; s/\.[ \n]*"$/\. "/; p; n; x } — otherwise:

    1. H — add to the hold buffer
    2. g — move hold buffer to the pattern space
    3. s/\.[ \n]*"$/\. "/ — do the replacement
    4. p — print it out
    5. n — read next line
    6. x — and keep it in the hold buffer
share|improve this answer

This might work for you:

sed ':a;$!N;s/\.\n"/."/;P;D' /tmp/a
His doctor attributed this to an allergy .

That hardly convinced him , as he had no history of allergies of any kind ." Yet , that  was to be the least of his problems .
I may have to take steroids for the rest of my life ."
A topical steroid spray was later added to his repertoire of drugs and 
" he knew it was merely masking the underlying condition ."
share|improve this answer

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