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For example, I have an array:

a=[1:5 8:10];

If I display it using:

disp(['a = ' num2str(a)]);

The result would be something like

a = 1 2 3 4 5 8 9 10

It's quite too long than I need. How can I let Matlab to display as same as the way I defined it or as close as is?

Be more specific, if I defined the variable in an "informal" way like:

a=[1:3 4:6 8:10]

(should be normally 1:6 instead of 1:3 4:6)

I just want Matlab to display in either way:

1:3 4:6 8:10    or    1:6 8:10

I also not care about whether it displays the variable name or square brackets.

Searched but didn't find anything useful. Considered to manually parse it but doesn't sounds like a clever way.

Any suggestion would be great helpful, thanks a lot.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The only way to do this would be to create your own function to display the arrays in the format you want. For example, if you want to display monotonically-increasing portions of your array in a condensed fashion, you could use a function like this:

function display_array(array)
    str = cellfun(@(n) {num2str(n)}, num2cell(array));
    index = (diff(array) == 1) & ([1 diff(array, 2)] == 0);
    str(index) = {':'};
    str = regexprep(sprintf(' %s', str{:}), '( :)+\s*', ':');
    disp([inputname(1) ' = [' str(2:end) ']']);
end

And you would use it like so:

>> a = [1:5 7 9:11]  %# Define a sample array

a =

     1     2     3     4     5     7     9    10    11     %# Default display

>> display_array(a)
a = [1:5 7 9:11]     %# Condensed display
>> b = [1 2 3 4 4 4 3 2 1];  %# Another sample array
>> display_array(b)
b = [1:4 4 4 3 2 1]  %# Note only the monotonically increasing part is replaced
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Incredible! Thanks a lot! I'm trying to understand your code, as I'm relatively new to Matlab, many functions you used are not familiar at all, such as cellfun, regexprep. Anyway, thumb up for your amazing answer. Thanks again! –  Tide Gu Apr 25 '12 at 16:09
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For this, I use vec2str from the Matlab file exchange. For example:

str = vec2str([1 3 5 5 9 8 7 6 5]) 
ans = 
    [1:2:5,5,9:-1:5] 

>> eval(str) 
ans = 
     1 3 5 5 9 8 7 6 5 
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Good find. I knew someone must have done something like this before. –  gnovice Apr 25 '12 at 15:40
    
Tried so, my Matlab reports: Undefined function 'vec2str' for input arguments of type 'double'. –  Tide Gu Apr 25 '12 at 16:02
    
Update: I tried help vec2str, it said function not found. Which package should this function in? I'm running R2011b on Mac OS X, not sure if I installed enough package. –  Tide Gu Apr 25 '12 at 16:04
2  
@TideGu: You have to download the function from the File Exchange, then place it in a folder on your MATLAB path. It isn't included in any MATLAB package, as it's created by an individual user. –  gnovice Apr 25 '12 at 16:14
    
@gnovice: Thanks, I didn't noticed that you meant I should download it. The function name was just looks like built-in. Sorry for ask. Thanks a lot. –  Tide Gu Apr 25 '12 at 16:19
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Impossible. Matlab throws away your definition very quickly. The "object" a has no knowledge of that definition at all.

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Thanks for your point. I was wondering if there is any built-in function "formats" the output. –  Tide Gu Apr 25 '12 at 16:06
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