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I have two files file1 is a query file and file2 is a kind of dictionary each of 1 column. I want to check if the element of file1 is present in file2 it should give 1 else 0 as an output.

This is what I am doing:

#!/bin/bash
for i in `cat file1 `
   do
     cat file2 | awk '{ if ($1=="'$i'") print 1 ; else 0 }'>>output
   done 

Please give your suggestions to improve the commands

Thank you

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1  
Looks like grep would be a better fit than awk for this task. If you have fgrep available, this the exact sort of task for which it was designed. –  Jerry Coffin Apr 25 '12 at 15:10
    
would you mind giving a two line demo of it –  Angelo Apr 25 '12 at 15:12
2  
can't you compare them two with diff ? –  ant Apr 25 '12 at 15:14
5  
@Angelo: It looks like your entire script reduces to: fgrep -f file1 file2 > output. I should add that if you don't have fgrep available, grep -F is normally the same. –  Jerry Coffin Apr 25 '12 at 15:16
    
@Jerry Coffin neat trick I salute you, why don't you provide an answer –  ant Apr 25 '12 at 15:19
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

One way:

Content of file1:

monday
tuesday
wednesday
thursday
friday
saturday
sunday

Content of file2:

tuesday
saturday

Execute next awk command:

awk 'FNR == NR { f2[ $1 ] = 1; next } FNR < NR { print (($1 in f2) ? 1 : 0) >"output" }' file2 file1

Content of output:

0
1
0
0
0
1
0
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It looks like your entire script reduces to:

fgrep -f file1 file2 > output

I should add that if you don't have fgrep available, grep -F is normally the same.

fgrep (or, usually, grep -F) is normally implemented with the Aho-Corisack string matching algorithm, so it's normally quite a bit faster than using grep repeatedly. The one thing to keep in mind (which isn't entirely clear here, but seems likely) is that the f in fgrep stands for fixed -- it matches any of a number of alternative fixed strings quickly, but it does not to REs at all -- each string is simply matched literally.

If you need RE matching, you can still use the -f option with grep, so you'd get:

grep -f file1 file2 > output
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