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Anyone have any ideas why this doesn't work (C# or VB.NET or other .NET language doesn't matter). This is a very simplified example of my problem (sorry for VB.NET):

    Private itsCustomTextFormatter As String
    Public Property CustomTextFormatter As String
        Get
            If itsCustomTextFormatter Is Nothing Then CustomTextFormatter = Nothing  'thinking this should go into the setter - strangely it does not'
            Return itsCustomTextFormatter
        End Get
        Set(ByVal value As String)
            If value Is Nothing Then
                value = "Something"
            End If
            itsCustomTextFormatter = value
        End Set
    End Property

If you do:

Dim myObj as new MyClass
Console.WriteLine(myObj.CustomTextFormatter)

You will be surprised at the result. It will print "Nothing". Anyone have any idea why it doesn't print "Something"

Here's a Unit Test per suggestion:

Imports NUnit.Framework

<TestFixture()> _
Public Class Test
   Private itsCustomTextFormatter As String
    Public Property CustomTextFormatter As String
        Get
            If itsCustomTextFormatter Is Nothing Then CustomTextFormatter = Nothing 'thinking this should go into the setter - strangely it does not' 
            Return itsCustomTextFormatter
        End Get
        Set(ByVal value As String)
            If value Is Nothing Then
                value = "Something"
            End If
            itsCustomTextFormatter = value
        End Set
    End Property

    <Test()>
    Public Sub Test2()
        Assert.AreEqual("Something", CustomTextFormatter)
    End Sub
End Class

This returns:

Test2 : Failed  
  Expected: "Something"
  But was:  null

at NUnit.Framework.Assert.That(Object actual, IResolveConstraint expression, String message, Object[] args)
at NUnit.Framework.Assert.AreEqual(Object expected, Object actual)
share|improve this question
    
I'm surprised that value = "Something" compiles. Hmm looks like value isn't a keyword in VB.net, but just a normal parameter, which explains that it compiles. –  CodesInChaos Apr 25 '12 at 15:50
    
It's a string, you don't have to "New" it when setting it –  Denis Apr 25 '12 at 15:52
1  
@CodeInChaos in C# you can do value = null; in a setter –  Andras Zoltan Apr 25 '12 at 15:53
    
Just to be sure: Did you compile this simplified program and check that it exhibits the problem? –  CodesInChaos Apr 25 '12 at 15:53
3  
@CodeInChaos: value is a keyword that refers to a variable. And of course you can reassign the value of a variable. –  Eric Lippert Apr 25 '12 at 16:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Your comment:

'thinking this should go into the setter - strangely it does not'    

calls out what your error is. In Visual Basic there are two ways to return something from a function:

Function GetSomeValue() As String
    Return "Hello"
End Function

or

Function GetSomeValue() As String
    GetSomeValue = "Hello"
End Function

Mixing these two styles is perfectly legal, but confusing and a bad practice:

Function GetSomeValue() As String
    GetSomeValue = "Hello" ' I should return Hello... '
    Return "GoodBye"       ' ...or perhaps not. '
End Function

As you can see, you are mixing the two styles in the getter. Setting that variable does not call the setter; it informs the runtime that when the getter returns, this is the value that it should return. You then override that value with your Return statement.

If it hurts when you do that then don't do that.

share|improve this answer
1  
@Denis Yes, there is. Setting [function/property name] = [some value] is essentially assigning just assigning an implicit return value, which gets returned at the end of the method if no other Return command is present before the end. –  Mike Guthrie Apr 25 '12 at 16:18
1  
@Denis Setting CustomTextFormatter = Nothing is telling CustomTextFormatter to default return Nothing if there is no other return statement. But, you don't get that far, as you instead reach Return itsCustomTextFormatter, where the value of itsCustomTextFormatter is still nothing, because the Set has not been called. –  Mike Guthrie Apr 25 '12 at 16:21
1  
@Denis It's poor design to call the the setter from the getter. That said, you may be able to do so by explicitly stating Me.CustomerTextFormatter = Nothing. –  Mike Guthrie Apr 25 '12 at 16:22
1  
@GuthMD: You're absolutely right! Damn VB.NET - you got me again!!!! That's it - this is going to be some poor shmuck's interview question! –  Denis Apr 25 '12 at 16:25
1  
@CodeInChaos: It is indeed an odd practice to call the setter from the getter, but it does occasionally happen. Particularly if the value in question is lazily computed; the getter might check to see if the value is already computed and if so, return it. If not, then it computes it, calls the setter to cache the value for next time, and returns it. –  Eric Lippert Apr 25 '12 at 16:28

Works fine for me in a unit test; albeit in C# (see below).

(after some playing)

Ah got it! It's because you're calling CustomTextFormatter = Nothing which, in the scope of the Getter is actually just setting the return value of the enclosing accessor method - it's not actually firing the setter (if you put a breakpoint in your setter you will see and debug it you'll see it steps right over it).

Basically you really shouldn't be doing this kind of pattern anyway; it's not the way to return a default property value. This would be better (or to use whatever the equivalent to the C# ?? operator is):

Public Property CustomTextFormatter As String
    Get
        If itsCustomTextFormatter Is Nothing Then
            Return "Something"
        End If
        Return itsCustomTextFormatter

    End Get
    Set(ByVal value As String)
        itsCustomTextFormatter = value
    End Set
End Property

Original C# Test

    private string _foo;
    private string foo
    {
        get
        {
            if (_foo == null)
                foo = null;
            return _foo;
        }
        set
        {
            if (value == null)
                value = "Something";
            _foo = value;
        }
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void Test()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual("Something", foo);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
see my VB.NET unit test above –  Denis Apr 25 '12 at 16:05
1  
I wonder why the behvior is different for VB.NET and C#? –  Denis Apr 25 '12 at 16:06
1  
@Denis C# is different from VB, because, erm, C# is a different language from VB. if you want to know why VB has Return and also the <functionname> = <value> technique: it is for backward compatibility with older versions of VB, which didn't have the Return statement for returning values from functions. You should probably prefer the Return statement in new code. –  MarkJ Apr 25 '12 at 16:40
1  
@Denis yes Me.CustomTextFormatter will work because it explicitly references the property at class scope. Whereas CustomTextFormatter on its own uses the getter's implicit scope, where the name has a specific meaning as being the return value of the function itself. Gnarly, yes, but its part of the language, so hey-ho :D –  Andras Zoltan Apr 25 '12 at 18:57
1  
@Denis, it makes sense if you know VB 6 and earlier. These languages did not have a Return keyword. Instead, functions have an implicit variable using the function name to hold the return value. In other words, to return 7 from Function SomeFunction() As Integer you would have to have a statement like SomeFunction = 7. The same, confusingly, is true for property getters, so to avoid that you have to use Me.PropertyName = valueWithWhichToCallSetter. VB.NET kept the syntax while also adding a Return keyword. –  phoog Apr 26 '12 at 22:14

Because you never actually initialized the variable. You would have to "Set" the property to nothing to actually get "Something". To fix it you should probably set the default value when declaring the internal variable

Private itsCustomTextFormatter As String = "Something"
share|improve this answer
    
I don't understand your reasoning. –  CodesInChaos Apr 25 '12 at 15:55
    
Not sure how this is relevant –  Denis Apr 25 '12 at 16:03

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