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Basically I have a container set to absolute positioning, for which I CAN'T set a width or height for... so it needs to wrap around the content automatically.

However, inside the absolute div, are 3 divs that are set to "float: left", so that they will stack up next to eachother.

Once I set the parent to be absolute positioned, the 3 inside divs jumps down, and the parent div, doesn't wrap around them.

Is it possible at all? So that I can wrap an absolute div, around 3 floating ones (next to one another)

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Are you clearing the float left? –  Umair Apr 25 '12 at 16:33

3 Answers 3

apply overflow:hidden to parent div

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Make sure you are using a clear element following your floats (withing your abs position div)

Here is the Fiddle for it

CSS:

.left{
float:left
}
.clearL{
height:1px;
margin-bottom:-1px;
clear:left;
}
#wrapper
{
 padding:5px;
background-color:#e37c00; 
}

​ HTML:

<div id="wrapper">
    <div id="divOne" class="left">
       <p>Some content goes here...</p>
    </div>
    <div id="divTwo"  class="left">
       <p>Some content goes here...</p>
    </div>
    <div id="divThree"  class="left">
       <p>Some content goes here...</p>
    </div>
    <div class="clearL">
    </div>
<div/>

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While this may work, it's much more complicated than is required for the op's issue. Also, you're not applying absolute positioning to the wrapper in your example. –  Madbreaks Apr 25 '12 at 16:46
    
@Madbreaks Don't understand why it would be so complicated, a few classes and the same html. Also, you don't have to apply the abs pos to verify that the container is wrapping properly, which was the original question. But, good job on pointing that one out... –  TNCodeMonkey Apr 25 '12 at 20:23

This will do the trick:

div.wrapper { /* outer-most div */
    ...       /* other styles */
    overflow:auto;
}

I use this often, works great inin all modern browsers.

Cheers

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Using your way adds unwanted scrollbars, better stick with overflow: hidden for such cases. –  skip405 Apr 25 '12 at 18:59

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