Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to make the output of my code without brackets and commas:

import itertools
import pprint
run = 1
while run != 0:
    number = raw_input('\nPlease type between 4 and 8 digits and/or letters to run permutation: ')

    if len(number) >= 4 and len(number) <= 8:
        per = list(itertools.permutations(number))
        pprint.pprint(per)
        print '\nNumber of possible combinations: ',len(per),'\n'

    elif number == 'exit':
        run = 0

    else:
        raw_input('length must be 4 to 8 digits and/or letters. Press enter to exit')
        run = 0

So it prints out a list with each combination in a new line. How do I print it without getting the brackets and commas? I still want to be able to call per[x] to get a certain combination. Any help appreciated! Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
"without getting the brackets and commas" Could you give an example of what format you want to see? Should each line only contain digits (separated by spaces, e.g. 0 1 2 3), or should each line look like the repr for the entry in the list (e.g. (0, 1, 2, 3))? –  Darthfett Apr 25 '12 at 17:08

7 Answers 7

up vote 0 down vote accepted

use join()

per = list(itertools.permutations(number))
        for x in per:
            print "".join(x)
        print '\nNumber of possible combinations: ',len(per),'\n'
share|improve this answer
    
This is the output I wanted! Thank you! –  xrefor Apr 25 '12 at 17:09
    
Note that join, (at least in python 3.x) does not do implicit string conversion of objects, so this code isn't future proof (though the print statement implies this). Guido himself gave the rational for why there is no implicit string conversion -- to detect buggy code. –  Darthfett Apr 25 '12 at 17:31

Loop through them and print each one separated by the character you like (here space):

#pprint.pprint(per)
for p in per:
    print ' '.join(p)
share|improve this answer

Just replace pprint() with your own bit of code to output the data. Something like this:

for i in per:
    print i
share|improve this answer
    
I tried : for i in per: print i I still get parantheses and commas. I want the output without it. –  xrefor Apr 25 '12 at 17:03

I would convert the list to a string then remove the brackets and commas:

x = str(per)[1 : -1]
x.replace(",", "")
print x
share|improve this answer

Instead of using pprint.pprint, which will print the repr of an object, you should use the regular print, which will not change newlines to a literal '\n':

print('\n'.join(map(str, per)))

Had to map str over per, as string.join expects a list of strings.

Edit: Example output shows each permutation is not separated by commas, and you do not see the bracket for the list:

>>> print('\n'.join(map(str, itertools.permutations([0, 1, 2, 3]))))
(0, 1, 2, 3)
(0, 1, 3, 2)
(0, 2, 1, 3)
(0, 2, 3, 1)
(0, 3, 1, 2)
(0, 3, 2, 1)
(1, 0, 2, 3)
(1, 0, 3, 2)
(1, 2, 0, 3)
(1, 2, 3, 0)
(1, 3, 0, 2)
(1, 3, 2, 0)
(2, 0, 1, 3)
(2, 0, 3, 1)
(2, 1, 0, 3)
(2, 1, 3, 0)
(2, 3, 0, 1)
(2, 3, 1, 0)
(3, 0, 1, 2)
(3, 0, 2, 1)
(3, 1, 0, 2)
(3, 1, 2, 0)
(3, 2, 0, 1)
(3, 2, 1, 0)
share|improve this answer

Replace pprint.pprint with something like:

for line in per:
    print ''.join(line)

Here's a more compact version of your code snippet:

import itertools

while True:
    user_input = raw_input('\n4 to 8 digits or letters (type exit to quit): ')
    if user_input == 'exit':
        break
    if 4 <= len(user_input) <= 8:
        # no need for a list here, just unfold on the go
        # counting via enumerate
        for i, p in enumerate(itertools.permutations(user_input)):
            print(''.join(p))
        print('#permutations: %s' % i)
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! This really helps me see the easy changes I can make to get my code more compact. Great addition! –  xrefor Apr 26 '12 at 10:10

Other variation of the answer

(lambda x: ''.join(x))(x)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.