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I'm using asp.net mvc 4 webapi beta to build a rest service. I need to be able to accept POSTed images/files from client applications. Is this possible using the webapi? Below is how action I am currently using. Does anyone know of an example how this should work?

[HttpPost]
public string ProfileImagePost(HttpPostedFile profileImage)
{
    string[] extensions = { ".jpg", ".jpeg", ".gif", ".bmp", ".png" };
    if (!extensions.Any(x => x.Equals(Path.GetExtension(profileImage.FileName.ToLower()), StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase)))
    {
        throw new HttpResponseException("Invalid file type.", HttpStatusCode.BadRequest);
    }

    // Other code goes here

    return "/path/to/image.png";
}
share|improve this question
2  
That only works with MVC not the WebAPI framework. – Phil Apr 25 '12 at 16:57
    
You should be able to just grab the item from Request.Files – Tejs Apr 25 '12 at 16:59
3  
The ApiController does not contain the HttpRequestBase which has the Files property. It's Request object is based on the HttpRequestMessage class. – Phil Apr 25 '12 at 17:03
up vote 100 down vote accepted

see http://www.asp.net/web-api/overview/working-with-http/sending-html-form-data,-part-2, although I think the article makes it seem a bit more complicated than it really is.

Basically,

public Task<HttpResponseMessage> PostFile() 
{ 
    HttpRequestMessage request = this.Request; 
    if (!request.Content.IsMimeMultipartContent()) 
    { 
        throw new HttpResponseException(HttpStatusCode.UnsupportedMediaType); 
    } 

    string root = System.Web.HttpContext.Current.Server.MapPath("~/App_Data/uploads"); 
    var provider = new MultipartFormDataStreamProvider(root); 

    var task = request.Content.ReadAsMultipartAsync(provider). 
        ContinueWith<HttpResponseMessage>(o => 
    { 

        string file1 = provider.BodyPartFileNames.First().Value;
        // this is the file name on the server where the file was saved 

        return new HttpResponseMessage() 
        { 
            Content = new StringContent("File uploaded.") 
        }; 
    } 
    ); 
    return task; 
} 
share|improve this answer
2  
What is the benefit of using a Task to read just one file? Genuine question, I'm just beginning to use Tasks. From my current understanding, this code is really suited for when uploading more than one file correct? – Chris Aug 9 '12 at 10:45
1  
There's no synchronous API here, you really need to use the task. I've been trying to circumvent the whole "ContinueWith" deal by calling Wait() on the result of ReadAsMultipartAsync, but that just hangs the whole thing. This works fine. – Dave Van den Eynde Aug 27 '12 at 17:36
29  
MultipartFormDataStreamProvider doesn't have BodyPartFileNames property any more (in WebApi RTM). See asp.net/web-api/overview/working-with-http/… – Shrike Dec 3 '12 at 15:08
4  
Guys, can any of you please shed some light on why we can't simply access files using HttpContext.Current.Request.Files and instead need to use this fancy MultipartFormDataStreamProvider? The full question: stackoverflow.com/questions/17967544. – niaher Aug 1 '13 at 3:19
3  
Files are being saved as BodyPart_8b77040b-354b-464c-bc15-b3591f98f30f. Should not they be saved like pic.jpg exactly as it was on the client? – lbrahim Aug 13 '14 at 12:35

I'm surprised that a lot of you seem to want to save files on the server. Solution to keep everything in memory is as follows:

[HttpPost, Route("api/upload")]
public async Task<IHttpActionResult> Upload()
{
    if (!Request.Content.IsMimeMultipartContent())
        throw new HttpResponseException(HttpStatusCode.UnsupportedMediaType); 

    var provider = new MultipartMemoryStreamProvider();
    await Request.Content.ReadAsMultipartAsync(provider);
    foreach (var file in provider.Contents)
    {
        var filename = file.Headers.ContentDisposition.FileName.Trim('\"');
        var buffer = await file.ReadAsByteArrayAsync();
        //Do whatever you want with filename and its binaray data.
    }

    return Ok();
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Thank you, you saved my friends from a lot of torture :) – Marin Nov 20 '13 at 14:50
16  
Keeping the files in memory can be useful if you don't want to spend diskspace. However, if you allow large files to be uploaded then keeping them in memory means your webserver will use up a lot of memory, which cannot be spend on keeping stuff around for other requests. This will cause problems on servers that work under high load. – Willem Meints Nov 28 '13 at 16:02
11  
@W.Meints I understand the reasons for wanting to store data, but I don't understand why anyone would want to store uploaded data on server disk space. You should always keep file storage isolated from the web-server - even for smaller projects. – Gleno Nov 29 '13 at 16:50
2  
@GaryDavies the default cap is 4MB. Not sure where you get 64k from... – Gleno Apr 20 '14 at 13:46
2  
Unfortunately, the MultipartMemoryStreamProvider doesn't help if you want to read form data aswell. Wanted to create something like a MultipartFormDataMemoryStreamProvider but so many classes and helper classes are internal in the aspnetwebstack :( – martinoss Apr 8 '15 at 16:19

See the code below, adapted from this article, which demonstrates the simplest example code I could find. It includes both file and memory (faster) uploads.

public HttpResponseMessage Post()
{
    var httpRequest = HttpContext.Current.Request;
    if (httpRequest.Files.Count > 0)
    {
        foreach(string file in httpRequest.Files)
        {
            var postedFile = httpRequest.Files[file];
            var filePath = HttpContext.Current.Server.MapPath("~/" + postedFile.FileName);
            postedFile.SaveAs(filePath);
            // NOTE: To store in memory use postedFile.InputStream
        }

        return Request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.Created);
    }

    return Request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.BadRequest);
}
share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for being awesome. – Mike Marks Feb 10 '14 at 22:14
1  
+ another 1 totally awesome !! Thanks ! – Greg Foote Feb 12 '14 at 16:39
11  
HttpContext.Current is null when WebAPI is hosted in OWIN which is a self hosting container. – Zach Apr 23 '14 at 5:58
1  
Fixed it like so: var httpRequest = System.Web.HttpContext.Current.Request; – msysmilu Oct 29 '14 at 17:30
3  
Do not use System.Web in WebAPI unless you absolutely have to. – Kugel Sep 16 '15 at 7:19

Here is a quick and dirty solution which takes uploaded file contents from the HTTP body and writes it to a file. I included a "bare bones" HTML/JS snippet for the file upload.

Web API Method:

[Route("api/myfileupload")]        
[HttpPost]
public string MyFileUpload()
{
    var request = HttpContext.Current.Request;
    var filePath = "C:\\temp\\" + request.Headers["filename"];
    using (var fs = new System.IO.FileStream(filePath, System.IO.FileMode.Create))
    {
        request.InputStream.CopyTo(fs);
    }
    return "uploaded";
}

HTML File Upload:

<form>
    <input type="file" id="myfile"/>  
    <input type="button" onclick="uploadFile();" value="Upload" />
</form>
<script type="text/javascript">
    function uploadFile() {        
        var xhr = new XMLHttpRequest();                 
        var file = document.getElementById('myfile').files[0];
        xhr.open("POST", "api/myfileupload");
        xhr.setRequestHeader("filename", file.name);
        xhr.send(file);
    }
</script>
share|improve this answer
    
Beware though that this will not work with 'normal' multipart form uploads. – Tom Jan 26 '15 at 13:46

I used Mike Wasson's answer before I updated all the NuGets in my webapi mvc4 project. Once I did, I had to re-write the file upload action:

    public Task<HttpResponseMessage> Upload(int id)
    {
        HttpRequestMessage request = this.Request;
        if (!request.Content.IsMimeMultipartContent())
        {
            throw new HttpResponseException(new HttpResponseMessage(HttpStatusCode.UnsupportedMediaType));
        }

        string root = System.Web.HttpContext.Current.Server.MapPath("~/App_Data/uploads");
        var provider = new MultipartFormDataStreamProvider(root);

        var task = request.Content.ReadAsMultipartAsync(provider).
            ContinueWith<HttpResponseMessage>(o =>
            {
                FileInfo finfo = new FileInfo(provider.FileData.First().LocalFileName);

                string guid = Guid.NewGuid().ToString();

                File.Move(finfo.FullName, Path.Combine(root, guid + "_" + provider.FileData.First().Headers.ContentDisposition.FileName.Replace("\"", "")));

                return new HttpResponseMessage()
                {
                    Content = new StringContent("File uploaded.")
                };
            }
        );
        return task;
    }

Apparently BodyPartFileNames is no longer available within the MultipartFormDataStreamProvider.

share|improve this answer
    
In WebApi RTM the BodyPartFileNames has been changed to FileData. See updated example at asp.net/web-api/overview/working-with-http/… – Mark Jun 13 '13 at 13:22
    
Why not just use System.Web.HttpContext.Current.Request.Files collection? – ADOConnection Oct 9 '13 at 11:43

Toward this same directions, I'm posting a client and server snipets that send Excel Files using WebApi, c# 4:

public static void SetFile(String serviceUrl, byte[] fileArray, String fileName)
{
    try
    {
        using (var client = new HttpClient())
        {
                client.DefaultRequestHeaders.Accept.Add(new MediaTypeWithQualityHeaderValue("application/json"));
                using (var content = new MultipartFormDataContent())
                {
                    var fileContent = new ByteArrayContent(fileArray);//(System.IO.File.ReadAllBytes(fileName));
                    fileContent.Headers.ContentDisposition = new ContentDispositionHeaderValue("attachment")
                    {
                        FileName = fileName
                    };
                    content.Add(fileContent);
                    var result = client.PostAsync(serviceUrl, content).Result;
                }
        }
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
        //Log the exception
    }
}

And the server webapi controller:

public Task<IEnumerable<string>> Post()
{
    if (Request.Content.IsMimeMultipartContent())
    {
        string fullPath = HttpContext.Current.Server.MapPath("~/uploads");
        MyMultipartFormDataStreamProvider streamProvider = new MyMultipartFormDataStreamProvider(fullPath);
        var task = Request.Content.ReadAsMultipartAsync(streamProvider).ContinueWith(t =>
        {
            if (t.IsFaulted || t.IsCanceled)
                    throw new HttpResponseException(HttpStatusCode.InternalServerError);

            var fileInfo = streamProvider.FileData.Select(i =>
            {
                var info = new FileInfo(i.LocalFileName);
                return "File uploaded as " + info.FullName + " (" + info.Length + ")";
            });
            return fileInfo;

        });
        return task;
    }
    else
    {
        throw new HttpResponseException(Request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.NotAcceptable, "Invalid Request!"));
    }
}

And the Custom MyMultipartFormDataStreamProvider, needed to customize the Filename:

PS: I took this code from another post http://www.codeguru.com/csharp/.net/uploading-files-asynchronously-using-asp.net-web-api.htm

public class MyMultipartFormDataStreamProvider : MultipartFormDataStreamProvider
{
    public MyMultipartFormDataStreamProvider(string path)
        : base(path)
    {

    }

    public override string GetLocalFileName(System.Net.Http.Headers.HttpContentHeaders headers)
    {
        string fileName;
        if (!string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(headers.ContentDisposition.FileName))
        {
            fileName = headers.ContentDisposition.FileName;
        }
        else
        {
            fileName = Guid.NewGuid().ToString() + ".data";
        }
        return fileName.Replace("\"", string.Empty);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Could you show how do you call you static method SetFile in your Controller? – lnanikian Feb 26 '15 at 15:43
    
This is a good answer. Extending the base provider like this also enables you to control the stream and gives you more flexibility than providing just a path i.e. cloud storage. – Phil Cooper Feb 26 at 7:37
[HttpPost]
public JsonResult PostImage(HttpPostedFileBase file)
{
    try
    {
        if (file != null && file.ContentLength > 0 && file.ContentLength<=10485760)
        {
            var fileName = Path.GetFileName(file.FileName);                                        

            var path = Path.Combine(Server.MapPath("~/") + "HisloImages" + "\\", fileName);

            file.SaveAs(path);
            #region MyRegion
            ////save imag in Db
            //using (MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream())
            //{
            //    file.InputStream.CopyTo(ms);
            //    byte[] array = ms.GetBuffer();
            //} 
            #endregion
            return Json(JsonResponseFactory.SuccessResponse("Status:0 ,Message: OK"), JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);
        }
        else
        {
            return Json(JsonResponseFactory.ErrorResponse("Status:1 , Message: Upload Again and File Size Should be Less Than 10MB"), JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);
        }
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {

        return Json(JsonResponseFactory.ErrorResponse(ex.Message), JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);

    }
}
share|improve this answer
4  
I think user need some explanation ...! – kamesh Jun 20 '14 at 7:01

I had a similar problem for the preview Web API. Did not port that part to the new MVC 4 Web API yet, but maybe this helps:

REST file upload with HttpRequestMessage or Stream?

Please let me know, can sit down tomorrow and try to implement it again.

share|improve this answer
[HttpGet]     
public ActionResult GetImage(string PicturePath)
{            
    try
    {                
        var dir = Server.MapPath("/HisloImages");
        var path = Path.Combine(dir, PicturePath);
        if (System.IO.File.Exists(path))
        {
            return base.File(path, "HisloImages");
        }
        else
        {
            return Content("Status: 1 , Message: Please give the Correct file Path.");
        }
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        throw ex; 
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
This is not an upload. – julealgon Nov 21 '14 at 14:59

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