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I am trying to run a partition query on a sample data.It's giving me different results if I remove ORDER BY clause.What is the reason for different results.Please check the below link.

http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!4/a0f10/5

SELECT MAX(B1.ET) OVER(PARTITION BY B1.MAS_DIV_KEY,B1.STN_KEY,B1.SBSC_GUID_KEY ORDER BY B1.ST)AS TEST_COL
FROM AM_PROGRAM_TUNING_EVENT_TMP1 B1;


SELECT MAX(B1.ET) OVER(PARTITION BY B1.MAS_DIV_KEY,B1.STN_KEY,B1.SBSC_GUID_KEY)AS TEST_COL1
FROM AM_PROGRAM_TUNING_EVENT_TMP1 B1;

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1  
And where in your query were you using an ORDER BY? –  Lamak Apr 25 '12 at 17:07
    
Which query? The goggles; they do nothing ... –  wildplasser Apr 25 '12 at 17:09
    
Let me post the queries here... –  SOaddict Apr 25 '12 at 17:10
    
I don't see any difference on those results –  Lamak Apr 25 '12 at 17:14
1  
@Lamak See this sqlfiddle.com/#!4/a0f10/6 - the first record in the first query is 11:05; the rest of the records are 11:50 –  Jake Feasel Apr 25 '12 at 17:23
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When you have an order by inside the OVER() clause for aggregations that aren't normally sensitive to sorting (min, max, stdev, etc...) it becomes a running subtotal. See Justin Cave's answer to the question below for a more thorough treatment.

Oracle MIN as analytic function - odd behavior with ORDER BY?

EDIT

Referring to the sqlfiddle here:

http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!4/a0f10/33

The first query:

SELECT B1.ST
  , B1.ET
  , MAX(B1.ET) 
    OVER(PARTITION BY B1.MAS_DIV_KEY
             ,B1.STN_KEY
             ,B1.SBSC_GUID_KEY 
         ORDER BY B1.ST
         ) AS TEST_COL
FROM AM_PROGRAM_TUNING_EVENT_TMP1 B1
ORDER BY B1.ST;

... returns

ST                            ET                            TEST_COL
March, 28 2012 11:00:00-0700  March, 28 2012 11:05:00-0700  March, 28 2012 11:05:00-0700
March, 28 2012 11:03:00-0700  March, 28 2012 11:15:00-0700  March, 28 2012 11:50:00-0700
March, 28 2012 11:03:00-0700  March, 28 2012 11:50:00-0700  March, 28 2012 11:50:00-0700
March, 28 2012 11:10:00-0700  March, 28 2012 11:30:00-0700  March, 28 2012 11:50:00-0700
March, 28 2012 11:20:00-0700  March, 28 2012 11:50:00-0700  March, 28 2012 11:50:00-0700

So let's break this down... The first row is a distinct ST so the MAX up to that point is whatever is in that row. Next row, the ST is not unique. So the MAX for all rows up to that point is not 11:15, but rather 11:50 for BOTH rows with ST 11:03. The final two rows never have ET after 11:50, so that's what we show for all remaining rows. We've used the ORDER BY in the OVER clause, so that's what we told Oracle to do.

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Not convinced with the answer... Can you explain me in detail... –  SOaddict Apr 25 '12 at 17:56
1  
As arturro points out, the default range on the analytical function will be the row in question through all previous rows based on the sort in the ORDER BY. If you add RANGE BETWEEN UNBOUNDED PRECEDING AND UNBOUNDED FOLLOWING, you should get the same results as without the ORDER BY. –  Jason Quinones Apr 25 '12 at 23:06
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Oracle documentation for analytic functions says:

*If you omit the windowing_clause entirely, then the default is RANGE BETWEEN UNBOUNDED PRECEDING AND CURRENT ROW.*

If you understand how RANGE works it should be clear why you are seeing such results.

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