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I have a file like this called Sample:-

206,,,206,14.9,0,2012/04/24 00:00:05
206,,,206,14.9,0,2012/04/24 00:00:21
205,,,205,14.9,0,2012/04/24 00:00:23
205,,,205,14.9,0,2012/04/24 00:00:29
207,,,207,14.9,0,2012/04/24 00:00:34
205,,,205,14.9,0,2012/04/24 00:00:40
204,,,204,14.9,0,2012/04/24 00:00:46
202,,,202,14.9,0,2012/04/24 00:00:52
201,,,201,14.9,0,2012/04/24 00:01:00
202,,,202,14.9,0,2012/04/24 00:01:04

And the following AWK command:-

awk -F, '{ gsub("/"," ",$7); gsub(":"," ",$7); t+=(mktime($7)-mktime(p)); printf ("%s,%s,%s\n",mktime($7),mktime(p),t); p=$7 }' Sample

Giving the following output:-

1335222005,-1,1335222006
1335222021,1335222005,1335222022
1335222023,1335222021,1335222024
1335222029,1335222023,1335222030
1335222034,1335222029,1335222035
1335222040,1335222034,1335222041
1335222046,1335222040,1335222047
1335222052,1335222046,1335222053
1335222060,1335222052,1335222061
1335222064,1335222060,1335222065

for each line, the 7th column is converted to an epoch date and the difference between the epoch date on the previous line is calculated and added to t.

On the first line being processed, because p is currently not a date, mktime returns -1 throwing out my figures.

What I want to do is, tell the AWK script, if line 1 is being processed then assume the difference is 6. At the moment it is subtracting -1 from 1335222005 resulting in 1335222006.

I want to say, start t at 6, then on the second line, work out the difference in epoch seconds to the previous line and increment t by that amount.

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You just need to do something special for line 1.

awk -F, '
    {gsub(/[\/:]/," ",$7); this_time = mktime($7)}
    NR != 1 {t += this_time - prev_time; print this_time, prev_time, t}
    {prev_time = this_time}
' << END

Given your input data, this prints

1335240021 1335240005 16
1335240023 1335240021 18
1335240029 1335240023 24
1335240034 1335240029 29
1335240040 1335240034 35
1335240046 1335240040 41
1335240052 1335240046 47
1335240060 1335240052 55
1335240064 1335240060 59

Alternately, a convenient way to initialize a variable is with awk'f -v option

awk -v t=6 '... same as before ...'
share|improve this answer
    
Have managed to do what I wanted to do using a variation of this. Many thanks. – general exception Apr 25 '12 at 19:00

In awk you can initialize a variable in a BEGIN block, and exist two variables to get line number, both are useful for your case, FNR and NR:

BEGIN { t = 6 }

or

FNR == 1 { t = 6 }
share|improve this answer

Would using BEGIN (see here) help? That will allow initialization of t variable to whatever you want. Something like

  awk -F, 'BEGIN {t=6} { gsub("/"," ",$7); gsub(":"," ",$7); t+=(mktime($7)-mktime(p)); printf ("%s,%s,%s\n",mktime($7),mktime(p),t); p=$7 }' Sample
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