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I have found this piece of code in a book:

void DeleteList(element *head)
{
  element *next, *deleteMe;
  deleteMe = head;
  while (deleteMe) {
    next = deleteMe->next;
    free(deleteMe);
    deleteMe = next;
  }
}

Assuming that the argument that we are passing to the function is the pointer to the head of the list, why are we not passing a reference to that pointer?

If we don't do that, aren't we just going to delete a local copy of that pointer? That is why we pass reference pointers right? So the callee get the changes that have been done inside the function?

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We delete the chunk pointed to by the local copy of that pointer. –  Park Young-Bae Apr 25 '12 at 17:49

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If we don't do that, aren't we just going to delete a local copy of that pointer?

Well, there is no such thing as a reference in C, but I assume you mean a pointer-to-pointer, and the answer would be no.

You are freeing the memory that the pointer points to on the heap, not the pointer itself. You are not mutating the pointer, so a copy is fine. Regardless of whether it is a copy or not, they point to the same place.

You are confusing this with assigning a completely new value to a variable passed to a function, in which case you would need to take a pointer-to-pointer. for example:

// only changes the local copy
void init(some_type *foo) {
    foo = malloc(sizeof(some_type));
}

// initializes the value at *foo for the caller to see
void init(some_type **foo) {
    *foo = malloc(sizeof(some_type));
}
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Passing a pointer to a pointer (not a reference to a pointer, because C does not have references at all) would be a better solution, because you'd be able to null it out after the deletion. As it is currently defined, the function may leave dangling pointers behind if its caller is not careful. Other than that little problem, this solution is valid: the caller can always assign NULL to the list head manually after passing it to DeleteList().

Here is how I would rewrite this with a pointer to pointer:

void DeleteList(element **head) {
    element *next, *deleteMe;
    deleteMe = *head;
    while (deleteMe) {
        next = deleteMe->next;
        free(deleteMe);
        deleteMe = next;
    }
    *head = NULL;
}
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When calling free, the pointer itself is not changed, so there is no need to pass it by reference.

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You don't need to change the value of the head of the list in the caller.

// caller
DeleteList(head);
// head points to an invalid place (the place where the list used to be)
// for convenience sake, reset to NULL
head = NULL;
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The code from @dasblinkenlight can be made more compact.

void DeleteList(element **head) {
    element *deleteMe;
    while ((deleteMe = *head)) {
        *head = deleteMe->next;
        free(deleteMe);
    }
}
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